Education

EXPAND YOUR KNOWLEDGE

With four days of education, including an auxiliary seminar on Friday, March 8, you may satisfy your annual CEH requirements in one event. The Convention Committee has selected educational programs that provide an impressive lineup of speakers and subjects. The variety of topics will appeal to any interest. Be sure to join us for the networking events as well. All education sessions except the auxiliary seminar will take place at the Phoenix Convention Center. The auxiliary seminar will take place at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown. Please check the Schedule of Events for location of all convention events.

Schedule subject to change

Presentation Classification Codes:

Air Barriers: AB
Building Commissioning: BECxP
Building Enclosure: BE
Building Enclosure Technology: BET
Business/Professional Development: BPD
Codes & Standards: C&S
Exterior Wall: EW
Leak Detection: LD
Restoration: RS
Roofing: R
Waterproofing: WP
Wind: W
Safety: S
Sustainability: SUS
Testing: T

Friday, March 8

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.: Auxiliary Seminar: IIBEC Reroofing

Session Classification: R
Credits: This course has been approved for 8.0 IIBEC CEHs. | This session is approved for 8.0 AIA LU HSW.
Price: IIBEC Member: $400 | Nonmember: $550

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define reroofing terminology.
  • Identify reference and resource materials for reroofing applications.
  • Recognize and select proper methods and techniques for performing visual observations of existing roof systems, roof scanning, and investigation.
  • Consider building code requirements and how to incorporate code compliance into reroof designs.
  • Explain the preparation of reroof design documents and how to deliver those documents properly for bid processing.

Session Description

This course covers a range of concepts, including a discussion of the steps required for the roof consultant to successfully evaluate an existing roof and to make decisions regarding roof design using available references, resources, and evaluation techniques. Speakers will present a review of reroof options and decision-making principles, building code considerations, reroof considerations, and examples of roof systems. Proper preparation of plans and specifications is presented to clarify the delivery of these documents. The roles of the stakeholders in the bid process are discussed. This course examines the elements required to properly execute meetings, project site visits, design resolutions, and project closeout. This course is designed for building consultants, architects, and engineers who regularly engage in the renovation of existing buildings (schools, office buildings, industrial buildings, etc.).

Registrants will receive an email prior to the course with questions to consider that will be utilized during a time of instructor-facilitated discussion. Also included is a time for summative review, providing participants an opportunity to engage with the instructors while responding to self-assessment questions. Lunch will be provided.

Schedule
7:30 AM – 8:00 AM: Registration &. Coffee
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM: Course instruction
10:00 AM – 10:15 AM: Break
10:15 AM – 11:00 AM: Instructor-led discussion
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM: Course instruction
12:00 PM – 12:30 PM: Lunch
12:30 PM – 2:15 PM: Course Instruction
2:15 PM – 2:30 PM: Break
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM: Course instruction
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM: Summative review
4:30 PM – 5:00 PM: Wrap-up, Q&A

Aaron B. Nelson, RBEC, RRC, RWC, RRO
Roofing Technical Services
Stanwood, Washington

Aaron B. Nelson, RBEC, RRC, RWC, RRO, is the President of Roofing Technical Services. He started in the roofing industry just after graduating from high school by working as a sheet metal fabricator/installer. Working his way into the office of a commercial roofing contractor in Seattle, he worked as an estimator/project manager for 10 years. In 2004 He joined the consulting side of roofing and started working on projects across the nation. Nelson and the team at RTS provide consulting and quality-assurance observations for our clients on projects throughout the nation, working with various code and climate conditions that make each project unique.

Stephanie Robinson, PEng
WSP Canada Inc.
Ottawa, Ontario

Stephanie Robinson, PEng, is the director of building sciences, Eastern Canada for WSP Canada Inc. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, she has over 15 years’ experience in the building enclosure industry, including investigation, design, contract administration, and construction review of building enclosure components for new and existing construction in both Canada and the United States. She recognizes that there is more than one solution to every challenge and believes that careful consideration of every option will lead to a unique strategy to both fulfill a client’s needs and optimize a building’s performance. Robinson is a licensed professional engineer in Ontario and a Level 2 Certified Thermographer. She was one of the founding members of the IIBEC Quebec Ontario Chapter and currently sits on the IIBEC Board of Directors as director of Region VII.

Saturday, March 9

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.: GENERAL SESSION–Our Fragile World; Resilient Building Systems and Infrastructure Preparedness against Natural Disasters

Session Classification: BE, SUS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEH | This session has been submitted for AIA CES.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the concept of resilience in the context of building systems and infrastructure, illustrating its importance in a delicate world.
  • Recognize the various strategies and innovations presented for ensuring the robustness of structures in the face of environmental challenges.
  • Review the effectiveness of proactive measures in fortifying building systems and their role in enhancing resilience against natural calamities.
  • Define the principles of resilient building systems and infrastructure preparedness to real-world scenarios, emphasizing their role in fostering sustainability and protection.

Session Description

This presentation will explore the imperative of resilience in a delicate world as we examine the preparedness of building systems and infrastructure against natural disasters. This presentation will review the strategies and innovations ensuring the robustness of structures in the face of environmental challenges. Discover how proactive measures fortify these systems, enhancing their ability to withstand and recover from the impact of natural calamities. Join us in understanding the pivotal role of resilient building systems and infrastructure preparedness in fostering sustainability and protection in our vulnerable world.

Speaker

Peter Gaynor, CEM
GEI Consultants
Jamestown, Rhode Island

Gaynor served as Senate-confirmed deputy and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) administrator from November 2018 through January 2021. He also served as the acting secretary of Homeland Security in the final month of the previous administration, during which he ensured the safe, secure, and peaceful transition of presidential power on January 21, 2021.

During his time at FEMA, he led the agency’s response to more than 300 presidentially declared emergencies and major disasters. In 2020, Gaynor oversaw FEMA’s first-ever operational response to a nationwide pandemic while simultaneously responding to a record number of disasters.
Before FEMA, he led emergency management agencies for the state of Rhode Island and the city of Providence.
Prior to his experience as an emergency manager Gaynor served for 26 years as an enlisted Marine and infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps.

Gaynor received a bachelor’s degree in history from Rhode Island College and a master’s degree in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: A Deep Dive into Hail-Caused Dents

Session Classification: R
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline understanding of metal roof applications, Galvalume coatings, and corrosion

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between and describe differences of various simulated hail-impact tests of metal roofs (including UL 2218 and ANSI FM 4473).
  • Explain the effects of salt spray (fog) testing of 26-gauge aluminum-zinc alloy coated steel R-panels after simulated hail-caused impact testing and scribing.
  • Describe the extent of corrosion (if any) typically detectable at real-world examples of large hail-caused dents in aluminum-zinc alloy coated steel panels.
  • Compare the results from the laboratory testing to our real-world investigations and previous published studies to evaluate whether the conditions observed in the laboratory are analogous to real-world weathering effects.
  • Explain the long-term effects of hailstone impact to the corrosion-resistance of aluminum-zinc alloy coating and whether those effects are expected to shorten the service life of steel roof panels.

Session Description

The paper presents a study of the effect of hailstone impact on the corrosion resistance of aluminum-zinc alloy coated metal roof panels.  The study is based on both laboratory salt-spray testing of panels impacted by simulated hail and inspections results from in-service panels impacted by large real-world hail more than two decades ago.  Participants will be able to consider the findings from laboratory testing results, real-world investigations, and previous published studies to evaluate the long-term effects of hailstone impact to corrosion resistive properties of the aluminum-zinc alloy coating and, in turn, whether such effects are expected to shorten the service life of panels.  This paper hopes to build upon a growing body of knowledge concerning the long-term effects of hailstone impact to aluminum-zinc alloy coated steel roof panels.

Jordan Beckner, PE, RRC
Roof Technical Services, Inc.
Fort Worth, Texas

Mr. Beckner, PE, RRC, is the Director of Engineering Services at Roof Technical Services, Inc. and a Registered Roof Consultant.  He earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Baylor University and is a licensed professional engineer in eleven states.  He has been working in the engineering field for more than 20 years, with more than 10 of those years specifically focused on roofs. He has investigated more than a thousand engineering projects related to storm damage, moisture intrusion, construction defects, structural failures, and building enclosure issues.

Stephen Patterson, PE, RRC
Roof Technical Services, Inc.
Fort Worth, Texas

Stephen L. Patterson, PE, RRC, has been in the roofing industry for 50 years.  He founded Roof Technical Services, Inc. (ROOFTECH) in 1983 and has been an active consulting engineer and roof consultant ever since.  ROOFTECH has provided laboratory testing, including testing for hail damage and hail resistance of prepared roof coverings, since the late 1980s.  Prior to becoming a consultant in 1983, he was a technical director/director of engineering for two roofing manufacturers and managed a roof contracting company.

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: Conundrums in Stucco Codes and Standards

Session Classification: BE, CS, EW
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Attendees should be familiar with stucco cladding requirements found in the 2021 ICC Building Code Chapters 1 and 25, as well as reference standards ASTM C926-18b, C1063-18b, and C1861.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize stucco is an assembly of different components, assembled in different ways, to achieve the intended quality and performance specific to each project.
  • Explain the building officials process for review and approval of alternative means and methods, including the requirement for approved testing.
  • Distinguish between mandatory and non-mandatory language in ASTM standards and differentiate between minimum requirements and nonrequirements.
  • Explain why the EOS clauses are neither valid nor enforceable and meet the International Building Code requirements at 102.5 for Partial Invalidity.
  • Recognize legitimate, codified regional practices for stucco claddings in the building code and ASTM standards.

Session Description

Minimum requirements for stucco wall cladding design, construction, and products for buildings are specified in the building code and its ASTM stucco reference standards, where harmony is expected. However, certain aspects of these requirements are confusing or not explicitly clear, inducing conflict and division that pervades the stucco industry in the United States. Clear, fact-based, and compelling answers to the most significant stucco conundrums facing the stucco industry today will be presented as significant new information, resulting from specialized research and a combined 60+ years of stucco industry experience to encourage consistency and quality within the stucco industry going forward.

Jeff Bowlsby
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
San Francisco, California

Jeff Bowlsby is a licensed architect in California and Nevada as well as a stucco consultant with Simpson Gumpertz & Heger based in Northern California. He specializes in exterior wall and stucco assembly consultations with architects, contractors, developers, stucco contractors, and property owners. His nationwide practice focuses on the design of new building construction and rehabilitation projects, and forensic evaluations. He has chaired or co-chaired several ASTM stucco committees, including ASTM C1063 and ASTM C1861, and has authored many peer-reviewed stucco-related technical articles published in national industry professional journals. He is the author of the stucco industry information resource StuccoMetrics.com.

Thomas Miller, PE
Structural Engineering and Inspections
Lutz, Florida

Thomas Miller, PE, graduated from the Florida Institute of Technology in 1994 with a bachelor of science in civil engineering. He is co-owner of Structural Engineering and Inspections Inc. (SEI). Miller is a licensed professional engineer and structural engineer in Florida, Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, North Carolina, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah, as well as a voting member of the Code Referenced Standards for Stucco. His engineering experience includes building design/inspections and forensic investigation/repair specifications. He has testified in state and federal courts as well as arbitration.

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: Mass Wall Construction and Repairs

Session Classification: EW, LD, RS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been submitted for AIA CES.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Previous knowledge of masonry mass wall construction and repairs

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify typical defects with mass wall construction.
  • Discuss the reasons for defects associated with mass wall construction.
  • Explain repair techniques for mass walls.
  • Describe original construction defects with mass walls.

Session Description

This presentation is a case study of two buildings constructed in 1950 with solid masonry mass exterior wall construction. The presentation focuses on the design, construction, deterioration, and repair of the building’s exterior mass walls. Topics discussed include leak evaluation, facade inspection, original construction, repairs, and maintenance.

Brian O’Donnell, RA, REWC, REWO
O’Donnell Architects
Rahway, New Jersey

Brian O’Donnell, RA, REWC, REWO, has over 30 years of experience in the design, investigation, repair, and rehabilitation of the building enclosure and has performed close-up inspections of hundreds of mid- and high-rise buildings. He is a registered architect in multiple states and is certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. He is an active member of the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants, ASTM International Committees E 06 Performance of Buildings D 08 Roofing and Waterproofing, and the Construction Specifications Institute.

11:00 a.m. - Noon: A (not-so) Perfect Storm- Wind, OSB & Low Slope Roof Systems

Session Classification: R
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline understanding of low-slope roofing components and systems.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify wind uplift and building pressurization issues with wood decks on large warehouse and industrial structures and the resulting effects on mechanically attached, single-ply roofing systems.
  • Describe wind and pressure-related failures of single-ply roof systems on distribution centers in the western United States.
  • Recognize variability in wood decking materials as well as the effect of pressure, cycling, and eccentric uplift forces in the acceleration of roof system failures.
  • Explain design and installation best practices along with repair recommendations to reinforce roof system reliability.

Session Description

While there is nothing new about wood decks, large warehouses, or mechanically attached, low-slope single-ply roof systems, current design and installation techniques have created a perfect storm resulting in performance and reliability issues that occur even under moderate weather events. This presentation will review existing mechanically attached, single-ply installations on large commercial warehouses to gain an understanding of building pressurization and wind uplift forces that can lead to premature failure of these systems. Upon completion, participants will recognize the limitations of OSB wood decking and the steps required for the successful design and installation of reliable and robust roof systems.

Speakers

Richard Gustin
Johns Manville
Denver, Colorado

Rick Gustin started his career as a roofing contractor before coming to Johns Manville (JM) in 1998, where he served as a field technical representative. He then held various roles, including technical services specialist, Six Sigma Black Belt, and application engineer before assuming responsibility as manager of Guarantee Services. In 2013, he became the EPDM product manager focusing on developing JM’s offering. Today, Rick is the Owner Services Technical Manager responsible for large claims and technical marketing support. He holds a degree in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Rob Hughes, CDT
Johns Manville
Denver, Colorado

Rob Hughes, CDT, joined Johns Manville (JM) in 2019, building on 25 years in the general contracting and commercial roofing industries. His roofing career has included estimating, operations, roof evaluation, contract administration, and project management. As part of JM’s Owner Services team, he provides internal technical training and support. Externally, Rob engages directly with building owners and property managers related to the lifecycle of the installed JM-guaranteed roof systems. Rob holds a CDT certification from CSI, 10- and 30-hour OSHA safety certifications, and is pursuing his Registered Roof Consultant accreditation from IIBEC.

11:00 a.m. - Noon: Reviving the Concrete Giants: The Role of Structures as Building Enclosures

Session Classification: BET, EW
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Requisite knowledge: structural systems, building enclosures, concrete

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the function of reinforced concrete as a structural material and as an integral component of a high-performing building enclosure.
  • Identify deterioration mechanisms in concrete-frame buildings and means to address deterioration, considering both building enclosure performance and structural requirements.
  • Explain risks associated with deteriorating concrete structures and the potential consequences of deferred maintenance and repairs.
  • Delineate best practices for exterior wall condition assessments and appropriate repair strategies to meet project-specific structural and building enclosure requirements.
  • Describe the evolution of model energy codes and standards, associated thermal-bridging concerns, and potential thermal-bridging mitigation strategies associated with exterior concrete structural elements.

Session Description

The vast inventory of existing buildings with exposed concrete framing will inevitably require repairs. For concrete-frame buildings where the exposed structure also serves as the building enclosure, deterioration can result in structural issues, fall hazards, and unsatisfactory building enclosure performance including water leakage and thermal bridging. This session will present information regarding deterioration and repair approaches from both structural and building enclosure performance perspectives. Topics discussed include concrete construction techniques over time, exterior condition assessment best practices, building enclosure performance requirements and energy codes, and considerations for preventative maintenance and repairs using both time-tested and novel approaches.

Speakers

Patrick E. Reicher, REWC, REWO, CCS, CCCA, SE
Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc.
Willowbrook, IL

Patrick Reicher, REWC, REWO, CCS, CCCA, SE, is a principal with Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc. He has experience with forensic investigation, evaluation, and repair design of existing building enclosures, as well as building enclosure consulting and commissioning for new construction projects. He is a licensed structural engineer in the state of Illinois and a professional engineer in several states. He is also a Registered Exterior Wall Consultant, Registered Exterior Wall Observer, Certified Construction Specifier, and Certified Construction Contract Administrator. He currently serves on several committees and task forces for IIBEC and the Fenestration and Glazing Industry Alliance.

Demetria E. Boatwright, CDT, PE, SE
Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc.
Willowbrook, IL

Demetria Boatwright, CDT, PE, SE, is a structural engineer at Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc. She has experience with a variety of projects involving condition assessment, field investigation, forensic research, and documentation of structural components and systems and distressed buildings. She is a licensed structural engineer in the state of Illinois and a professional engineer in the state of Wisconsin. She is an active member of the Structural Engineers Association of Illinois and its Women in Structural Engineering Committee, serving as secretary of the Resilience Committee for the National Council of Structural Engineers Association.

Non-presenting Co-author:
Colin P. Rueb, CDT, PE, SE
Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc.
Willowbrook, IL

Colin Rueb, CDT, PE, SE, is a structural engineer at Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc. and is experienced in structural investigations and material analyses of various building materials, with an emphasis on concrete construction. His background includes condition surveys, field and laboratory testing, structural analysis, and finite element modeling of distressed facade systems, building components, and various structures.

11:00 a.m. - Noon: Unmasking the Layers: A Journey through a Masonry Reclad Litigation Case Study

Session Classification: BE, BPD, EW
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU.
Knowledge Level: Introductory
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline understanding of masonry cavity wall system and construction litigation workflow

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the issues and claims involved in a masonry cavity wall cladding system.
  • Discuss legal pitfalls, strategies, and decision points that require consideration and timely action.
  • Explain the need for a focused systematic approach in order to minimize cost, and maximize efficiency, safety, and recovery of damages.
  • Relate the importance of evidence documentation in supporting claims.
  • Describe the roles of the engineer and attorney in a construction defects case in relation to a building that poses life-safety risks and requires massive repair while remaining continuously in use.

Session Description

A masonry cavity wall cladding system was installed at an office facility in 2012. Seven years later, the owner reported the stone dislodging. This case study examines the background, issues, evidence, decision points, and legal analysis resulting in a reclad of the facility. This presentation will highlight the importance of documentation and correspondence between parties, as well as supporting the claims for a plaintiff party while facilitating continuous use of the facility without interruption. A concise overview will be provided from the perspectives of the plaintiff’s representative engineer and attorney, offering insight into the complexities and challenges associated with a full building masonry reclad litigation case.

Speakers

Mallory Buckley, RRO, PE, BECxP + CxA+BE
Walter P Moore & Associates Inc.
Dallas, Texas

Mallory Buckley, RRO, PE, BECxP + CxA+BE, is a project manager in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group in Dallas. Her experience focuses on the field of building enclosure consulting. Her expertise includes assessing and designing repairs for distress conditions related to facade systems, building enclosure moisture management, roofing systems, and below-grade waterproofing on concrete substrates. Her portfolio includes developing work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for waterproofing, restoration, and rehabilitation projects. She currently serves on the IIBEC Emerging Professionals Committee and is an active member of the IIBEC North Texas Chapter.

Robert Hancock, MBA, JD
Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr PC
Houston, Texas

Bob Hancock, MBA, JD, is a co-practice leader and an equity shareholder in the Construction Law Practice Group of Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr PC. Before becoming a lawyer, he was a contractor with years of experience in construction management, commercial, heavy highway, and industrial process construction for companies such as H.B. Zachry, W.S. Bellows, and Austin Commercial. He has served as chairman of the construction section of the Houston Bar Association and sits on local and state legislative drafting and review committees for AGC of Texas and the Associated Builders and Contractors.

Non-presenting Co-author:
Kimani Augustine, PE
Walter P Moore & Associates Inc.
Houston, Texas

Kimani Augustine, PE, is a principal in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group in Houston. He has been in the engineering industry since 2004 and has experience in diversified aspects of enclosure diagnostics consulting, including managing a wide variety of building envelope projects and preparing design documents to address identified distress conditions. He is a leader in Walter P Moore & Associates’ Enclosure Diagnostics Practice, dedicated to developing step-by-step processes for finding solutions to building envelope issues. He is on the board of directors of the IIBEC Gulf Coast Chapter, where he actively serves in enhancing building enclosure knowledge in the Houston area.

Non-presenting Co-author:
Weijie Liu, EIT, BECxP, CxA+BE
Walter P Moore & Associates Inc.
Toronto, Ontario

Weijie Liu, EIT, BECxP, CxA+BE, is an associate in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group in Toronto. Weijie has experience in the field of building enclosure engineering. Her expertise includes 3rd party review, thermal modeling, building envelope moisture management, roofing systems, and below-grade waterproofing. She has also developed technical specifications for waterproofing projects.

Non-presenting Co-author:
Eliana Zhen Yan
Walter P Moore & Associates Inc.
Toronto, Ontario

Eliana Zhen Yan is a graduate enclosure consultant in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group in Toronto. Her expertise includes assessing and designing repairs for distress related to roofing systems and exterior wall assemblies. She is also experienced in developing construction documents and providing contract administration services for exterior facade projects.

Sunday, March 10

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.: Three Decades of R&D Advancement in Roofing

Session Classification: CS, R, W
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Knowledge of roofing, wind, and codes

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe wind effects on roofing.
  • Delineate wind standards for low slope roofs.
  • Recall load calculation as per building code.
  • Explain failure mode analysis.
  • Discuss climate adaptation.

Session Description

Three decades ago, members of the roofing community met at the National Research Council of Canada and formed a group with a common focus on evaluating roofing systems in a dynamic environment. As A result, the Special Interest Group on Dynamic Evaluation of Roofing Systems (SIGDERS) was created. SIGDERS’ operation is one of its kind in the world, with the legacy of a long-lasting research and development consortia. In this session, the impacts of SIGDERS on the industry will be discussed, including advancements in the areas of static vs. dynamic roof evaluations, diagnoses of the weakest link, significance of the roof edge, and field vs. code specification

Speaker

Appupillai (Bas) Baskaran, PhD, PEng, F–IIBEC
National Research Council Canada
Ottawa, Ontario

At the National Research Council of Canada, Bas Baskaran, PhD, F-IIBEC, PEng, is researching the wind effects on building envelopes through experiments and computer modeling. As an adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa, he supervises graduate students. As a professional engineer, he is a member of various committees and is a research advisor to various task groups of the Building Code of Canada. He has authored and/or co-authored over 300 research articles and received over 25 awards. Baskaran was recognized by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with the Diamond Jubilee medal for his contribution to fellow Canadians.

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.: Simplifying Whole Building Airtightness

Session Classification:AB, BE, C&S
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review the updated air barrier requirements in IECC 2024 and 2022 ASHRAE 90.1.
  • Define whole building airtightness testing and identify ways to ensure it is done correctly.
  • Describe the necessary components that should be included in construction documents to ensure an airtight enclosure.
  • Analyze five of the most frequently missed interface details that impact airtightness.

Session Description
Whole building airtightness testing, often referred to as “blower door testing”, is at the forefront of building performance verification, especially with the onset of net zero energy targets. Widespread adoption is currently limited to residential codes; however, there is considerable momentum in the commercial space. The IECC 2024 with the adoption of 2022 ASHRAE 90.1 will require whole building airtightness testing for most commercial buildings. This presentation outlines the new commercial building airtightness requirements, and test methods ASTM E779 and ASTM E3158, including the impact of airtightness requirements on design and construction. Additionally, the importance of using a qualified test technician will be discussed.

Speakers

Adam Ugliuzza, PE, CPHC
Sustainable Building Partners
York, Pennsylvania

Adam Ugliuzza, PE, CPHC, has 16 years of engineering experience focusing on building science and building enclosure construction. His experience includes enclosure consulting/commissioning services for new and existing construction, in addition to forensic investigations to determine the root cause of building performance issues. He brings industry-leading expertise in whole-building airtightness testing, which is at the forefront of high-performance building construction. His project work spans the United States and abroad, providing professional building enclosure consultation in both residential and commercial spaces for all types of construction, ranging from multifamily wood/timber framed buildings to high-performance institutional/healthcare facilities to high-rise construction.

Andrea Wagner Watts, LEED Green Associate
GAF
Arlington, Virginia

Andrea Wagner Watts, LEED Green Associate, is the building science education manager for GAF, engaging with industry professionals to provide guidance, technical support, and education for roof and wall assemblies. With more than 15 years of experience in the industry, Wagner Watts strives to improve the overall performance of building enclosures through application innovation, product development, and building science research. She has published on building science, assembly interfaces, durability, and resilience and holds multiple patents. She serves as an executive board member of the Air Barrier Association of America and is the co-chair of its technical committee. She also chairs the ASTM E06 Task Group on air barriers.

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.: The Current State of Embodied Carbon and Building Enclosures

Session Classification: BE, BET, SUS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Understanding of typical enclosure materials, embodied carbon basics, and whole building LCA.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Highlight the key documents used to track embodied carbon, including Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) and Product Category Rules (PCRs), including an explanation of Scope 1, 2, & 3 emissions.
  • Recall the main elements contributing to the building enclosure’s embodied carbon.
  • Identify steps to integrate presented research into enclosure material and systems, including hotspots for high-carbon materials, enclosure system types that are lagging in available product data, and various material and system benchmark comparisons.
  • Discuss ongoing and upcoming carbon-focused code and legislation initiatives that are affecting building enclosure materials, as well as action items to improve the carbon tracking for projects.

Session Description
In an effort to increase awareness and reduce the embodied carbon impacts of the building enclosure, this presentation will share research into current enclosure materials and systems, compare various enclosure systems to understand their relative carbon impacts from one to another, and highlight gaps in the critical data needed to calculate whole building life cycle analyses. The presentation will start by introducing environmental product declarations (EPDs) and their governing product category rules (PCRs) and will conclude by providing participants a glimpse into where the industry is headed in regard to future code and legislation requirements for low-carbon materials.

Speakers

Patrick Keeney, AIA, CPHC, LEED AP O+M
Walter P Moore
Washington, District of Columbia

Patrick Keeney, AIA, CPHC, LEED AP O+M, is a senior associate in Walter P Moore’s Washington, D.C., Enclosure Diagnostics group. With more than a decade of experience in high-performance buildings, sustainability, and architectural design, Keeney specializes in building enclosures. Having extensive experience with building simulations, environmental analyses, and building science, he brings a performance-based decision-making process to each project. A licensed architect and a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC), Keeney is a leader in numerous professional organizations, currently serving on AIA National’s Codes & Standards committee and the board of Washington, D.C.’s Building Enclosure Council chapter.

Nouha Javed PE, LEED General Associate
Walter P Moore
Washington, District of Columbia

Nouha Javed, PE, LEED General Associate, is an engineer in the Diagnostics Group of Walter P Moore with more than seven years of experience in structural and enclosure evaluation and restoration, where she has developed work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for waterproofing, restoration, and rehabilitation projects.
In addition to her engineering work, Javed actively leads the Sustainable Design task force for the Diagnostics Group at Walter P Moore. She effectively integrates the firm’s SE2050 commitment with ongoing project efforts. Furthermore, she co-leads the Washington DC chapter of the Carbon Leadership Forum, showcasing her commitment to sustainability and environmental awareness.

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.: Avoiding Pitfalls with Large Skylight Design and Maintenance

Session Classification: R
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Understanding of basic building enclosure concepts and materials, particularly familiarity with fenestration.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the various types of skylight design strategies, including their benefits and limitations.
  • Identify different types of skylight access strategies, used for maintenance, including seals and leaks.
  • Review the different skylight access strategies for glass replacement.
  • Review case studies for the concepts “simple framed drained systems,” “modern framed drained systems,” and “face-sealed structural glass systems” to provide context and understanding of the different skylight designs.

Session Description
Large skylights are complex building enclosure systems that require careful consideration of access and maintenance strategies in order to reduce potential headaches for building owners and contractors. This presentation will discuss the challenges skylights face in order to prevent leaks, achieve long-term durability, and permit access for maintenance. A review of various large skylight design strategies, including simple drained, engineered drainage systems, and face-sealed structural glass systems, will be undertaken. Skylight access for maintenance will also be discussed, including gantry systems, temporary access systems, and structural glass. The conclusion of the paper will focus on the proper planning for maintenance.

Speaker

Jordan Swail, BESc, P.Eng (ON). BSS
RJC Engineers
Kitchener, Ontario

Jordan Swail, BESc, PEng (ON). BSS, is an Associate with RJC Engineers. He has significant experience in complex building enclosure retrofit projects throughout southern Ontario and has led several of RJC’s most significant glazing retrofit projects, focusing on building renewal, energy efficiency, and greenhouse gas reductions. His expertise spans heritage restoration, glazing/cladding, and the roofing sectors. In addition to his professional work, he sits on the IIBEC Southern Ontario Board of Directors in the role of Marketing Director.

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.: Trust the Process: The Nuances of BECx

Session Classification: BECx, C&S
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Introductory
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline familiarity with new construction projects and enclosure consulting principles.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review the different phases of the building enclosure commissioning process.
  • Identify the various codes and standards bodies that have incorporated BECx.
  • Recognize 10 common misconceptions of BECx and list best practices for successful building enclosure commissioning.
  • Discuss real-project case study examples on how building enclosure commissioning can be successful or improved.

Session Description
Commissioning of building systems has existed for many years; however, building enclosure commissioning (BECx) is relatively new to the design and construction industries. This presentation will provide an overview of the BECx practice, its benefits, and the process as defined by industry standards and codes. A discussion regarding the 10 common misconceptions of BECx will help learners further recognize the nuances related to providing this service. Additionally, multiple case studies highlighting the challenges, successes, and pitfalls of delivering modern BECx projects will be presented. This lecture will offer BECx providers the necessary tools to help owners and clients trust the BECx process.

Speakers

Amaris Beza, PE, BECxP, CxA+BE
Walter P. Moore and Associates, Inc.
Orlando, Florida

Amaris Beza, PE, BECxP, CxA+BE is a project manager in the Diagnostics Group of Walter P. Moore and Associates, Inc. with experience related to building science, facade assessment, and building enclosure diagnostics. She has worked on several building enclosure commissioning projects and building enclosure third-party design reviews for clients, reviewing technical specifications and drawings for the continuity of building enclosure systems. She often provides construction administration services during new construction to observe the progress of work and recommend corrective action as needed. She is also experienced with façade and roofing assessments and diagnosing building enclosure issues in existing buildings.

Amos Chan, PE, BECxP, CxA+BE
Walter P. Moore and Associates, Inc.
San Francisco, California

Amos Chan, PE, BECxP, CxA+BE is an experienced enclosure consultant in the Diagnostics Group of Walter P. Moore and Associates, Inc., specializing in technical consulting for building enclosure systems including below-grade waterproofing, plaza waterproofing, air/water barriers, and roofing systems. He has assisted clients with peer reviews of design documents and preparation of waterproofing and roofing construction documents and has performed construction administration on buildings in the commercial office, government, higher education, healthcare, multifamily residential, and industrial sectors. He is also experienced with the building enclosure commissioning process, having been involved from the early design to warranty phases on various types of buildings.

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.: Glass Distortion: Not Such a Clear View

Session Classification: BET, EW, T
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU.
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: Basic understanding of architectural glass, the heat-treating process, and glass distortion.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the heat-treating process of architectural glass.
  • Recognize the different types of glass distortion.
  • Explain how glass curvature affects the image quality that is reflected on the glass surface.
  • Discuss criteria for specifying an objective and quantifiable means for evaluating the aesthetics of architectural glass.

Session Description
This case study examines a situation where project stakeholders agreed the images reflected on the glass surface of over 250 newly installed IGUs were egregiously distorted and considered unacceptable. Upon completion of the forensic investigation, it was confirmed that the issue was the result of a vertical distortion streak on the outboard lites.

Distortion of architectural glass is inherent to the heat-treating process. However, the vertical distortion streak discussed in this presentation could not be identified using traditional means for glass evaluation. Different methods for evaluating glass distortion will be discussed in this presentation.

Professionals working on monumental projects requiring high-quality architectural glass will find this presentation and case study of particular interest.

Speakers

Aaron Rosen, REWC, PEng
RosenBEC
Chesterfield, Missouri

Aaron Rosen is a principal at the building enclosure consulting firm RosenBEC. His certifications include Professional Engineer, FenestrationMaster®, BECxP, CxA+BE, and LEED AP BD+C. He has nearly 20 years of professional experience working with many different types of cladding and glazing systems. He has been retained numerous times to provide a third-party expert opinion on a variety of building enclosure-related issues. RosenBEC has been providing building enclosure consulting services on high-end projects across the United States since 2016.

Eric Hegstrom
LiteSentry/Softsolution
Tuscon, Arizona

Eric Hegstrom has led the development of glass inspection equipment for LiteSentry (now LiteSentry/Softsolution) for more than 20 years. He has more than 30 years’ experience in software engineering, the last 22 of which were spent designing and developing industrial vision, control, and automation systems for glass fabrication. He is active in developing industry standards and was most recently on the ASTM subcommittee for C1901 “Standard Test Method for Measuring Optical Retardation in Flat Architectural Glass.” His previous experience includes work with Apple, Applied Materials, and Perkin-Elmer.

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.: GENERAL SESSION–The Present and Future Outlook of the Building Enclosure Profession and Industry

Session Classification: BPD
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.5 AIA LU.
Knowledge Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the current state of the building enclosure industry.
  • Examine the contributions of sustainability and resilient building practices within the industry, as well as how innovation will lead to new advances in design, construction, and improved building materials.
  • Review the current workforce pipeline and learn strategies for recruiting and retaining valuable employees.
  • Explore the future direction of the building enclosure industry with the increasing complexity of building design and construction.

Session Description

How are technology and innovation creating improved materials, design, and construction methods for the building enclosure? The building enclosure industry is in a state of constant evolution, driven by advancements in technology, innovation, codes and standards, and the evolving workforce. The demand for sustainability and resilient buildings further contributes to the dynamic nature of this industry.

The panelists will delve into these topics, examining how they are currently addressing them within their respective sectors, and will share insights into their vision of the future of the building enclosure industry.

Speakers

Scott Hinesley, F-IIBEC, RRC, PE (Moderator)
REI Engineers Inc.
Charlotte, North Carolina

Scott Hinesley is the president of REI Engineers Inc. (REI), a building enclosure consulting firm with eight locations serving the eastern United States. Scott received his degree in civil engineering from North Carolina State University and worked for a multi services engineering firm in Raleigh, North Carolina, for several years before joining REI in 1998.

For over 20 years, he has been an active member of IIBEC and the American Council of Engineering Companies North Carolina Chapter (ACEC/NC). He recently completed his term as president for both organizations. He has served as president of the Carolinas Chapter of IIBEC and served on the Ethics Committee, the Technical Advisory Committee, and the IIBEC Interface Peer Review Committee.

Hinesley is a Registered Roof Consultant (RRC), a licensed professional engineer, a member of the IIBEC Jury of Fellows, and serves on the Board of Directors for the RCI-IIBEC Foundation. He resides in Charlotte, North Carolina, with his wife and two sons.

Homa Ghaemi, SE
Klein and Hoffman
Wilmette, IL

Homa Ghaemi, SE, is the chief executive officer of Klein and Hoffman, a structural and architectural engineering firm in Chicago, Illinois, with regional offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and drives the strategic vision of the firm, including the development of the leadership team, fiscal oversight, service offerings, and market sector focus. She holds a master of science degree in civil/structural engineering from Ohio State University, and an MBA from Kellogg School of Business, Northwestern University. A licensed structural engineer, her career has focused on enhancing existing buildings through renovation, adaptive reuse, and restoration.

 

Ted Sheridan, F-IIBEC, RBEC, RRC, REWC, RWC, PEng
Fishburn Sheridan & Associates Ltd
Ottawa, Ontario

Ted Sheridan is an engineer practicing in Ottawa, Ontario, and licensed in six provinces. He is president of Fishburn Sheridan & Associates Ltd., an Ottawa-based engineering firm with six offices across eastern Canada specializing in roofing, building enclosure, and structural work. A 1983 graduate of the University of Waterloo, Sheridan became a Registered Roof Consultant in 1992. He is also an IIBEC-accredited Registered Exterior Wall Consultant, Registered Waterproofing Consultant, and Registered Building Enclosure Consultant. He is a past president and Fellow of IIBEC.

Sheridan has been involved with investigations, assessments, testing, design, and quality assurance in over 3,000 roofing, building enclosure, and structural projects across Canada and in the US. He has lectured on a wide array of roofing subjects.

Monday, March 11

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.: GENERAL SESSION–Design for Tornado Loads in ASCE 7-22 and the 2024 IBC, with Applications to Building Enclosures

Session Classification: CS, W, BE
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been submitted for AIA CES.
Knowledge Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the recent changes in practice requiring consideration of tornado loads for conventional buildings and other structures, along with the rationale for incorporation of tornado loads in ASCE 7-22 and the 2024 IBC.
  • Evaluate the applicability of ASCE 7-22 tornado load requirements for site-specific buildings and other structures.
  • Determine site-specific tornado speeds as a function of geographic location, building/facility footprint area, and Risk Category, including use of the new ASCE 7 Hazards Tool.
  • Describe the new tornado load requirements in ASCE 7-22 and how they differ from ASCE 7 wind load requirements, based on differences in tornadic versus straight-line wind characteristics.

Session Description
The presentation will provide a brief overview of tornadoes and tornado hazards, the rationale for consideration of tornadoes in conventional engineering design, and the latest science on tornadic winds, including tornadic wind-structure interaction. A summary of the tornado load requirements in the ASCE 7-22 standard and the 2024 International Building Code will also be discussed. The load provisions are based on the wind load framework provided in ASCE 7 for other types of windstorms, with modifications for tornadoes. The impact of this paradigm shifts to now include tornadoes as a design hazard will be explored, including implications for design cladding loads and construction costs.

Speaker

Marc Levitan, PhD, F. SEI
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Gaithersburg, Maryland

Marc Levitan, PhD, F. SEI is the lead research engineer for the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology
(NIST). He served as lead investigator for the National Construction Safety Team technical investigation of the 2011 Joplin, Missouri, tornado and the 2013 Moore, Oklahoma, tornado study. He heads up the implementation of the recommendations resulting from these investigations, including chairing the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) committee that developed the tornado load provisions for ASCE 7-22 and the 2024 IBC; the International Code Council (ICC) committee that developed the 2023 and previous editions of the ICC 500 Storm Shelter standard; and the ASCE/SEI/AMS committee developing a new standard on Wind Speed Estimation in Tornadoes.

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: Unit Price Procurement: How IIBEC Is Advocating for Better Procurement Practices One Tender at a Time

Session Classification: BPD
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU.
Knowledge Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss how unit price procurement and cooperative purchasing approaches can be misused.
  • Identify future challenges of unit-price procurement strategies.
  • Identify steps IIBEC is taking to engage local procurement entities to improve purchasing practices.
  • Implement strategies individuals can take to help advocate for better procurement practices at all levels of government.

Session Description
An Analysis of Unit-Price Procurement” a study funded by the RCI-IIBEC Foundation and released in 2023, focuses on unit-price procurement of design and construction services. Based on interviews with vendors, cooperative purchasing list owners, regional cooperative purchasing agents, public owner facility managers, and public procurement staff—the study found that unit-price procurement, especially within cooperative purchasing arrangements, introduces opportunities for abuse in the prequalification, design, and construction phases of building projects. IIBEC has been using this new study to advocate for better procurement practices at the local, provincial, state, and federal levels.

Speakers

Burt Carver, RRC,RRO
Apex Building Sciences
Abbotsford, BC, CA

Burt Carver is the president of Apex Building Sciences Inc., a consulting firm specializing in building enclosure issues in Western Canada. He has been involved in roofing and waterproofing since the mid ’90s and started consulting full time in 1999. He has acted as a field reviewer, field technician, and project manager for several hundred projects. His areas of expertise include building condition assessment, technical specifications, document review, code compliance, building enclosure, and project closeout.

Paul S. Chinowsky

Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering Department – University of Colorado Boulder
Resilient Analytics
Broomfield, Colorado

Paul Chinowsky is professor emeritus in the Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering Department at the University of Colorado Boulder. He is currently director of analytics and resiliency at Stanley Consultants. Chinowsky’s research focuses on organization strategy in the engineering field, including approaches to technology innovation and strategic market positioning. He brings over 20 years of experience in engineering, computer science, management, and architecture to his research topics. He has worked with Fortune 500 organizations as well as leading ENR engineering and construction firms, providing expertise on global engineering and emerging issues. He has published results in both engineering and economic journals to disseminate evolutionary approaches to design organization strategy. 

Sidney I. Hankins III, RRC, AIA, F-IIBEC

Sidney I. Hankins III is a building construction consultant and architect located in Knoxville, Tennessee, and is president and owner of Roof Design & Consulting Services Inc.  He is a graduate of Clemson University (B.Arch) and a former assistant professor of architecture at the University of Tennessee School of Architecture. He maintains a building enclosure consulting and architectural practice and has been a member of RCI/IIBEC for more than 20 years. He is a past president of RCI/IIBEC and has served as regional director. He presently serves as a board member and treasurer of the RCI-IIBEC Foundation.

 

Brian Pallasch, CAE
IIBEC
Raleigh, North Carolina

Brian Pallasch joined the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants (IIBEC) as its executive vice president/CEO in June 2019. Responsible for the day-to-day management of the institute, Pallasch leads a staff of 20 headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina, focused on serving the needs of the building enclosure profession. Pallasch also serves as a director on the board of the RCI-IIBEC Foundation.

Prior to joining IIBEC, Pallasch served as managing director of government relations and infrastructure initiatives at the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in Washington, D.C. He was responsible for managing ASCE’s government relations department and was responsible for ASCE’s strategic initiative regarding infrastructure, including development of the Infrastructure Report Card. Previously, Pallasch was director of government relations for the American Subcontractors Association (ASA), Alexandria, Virginia, for three years, where he was responsible for all federal and state relations.

 

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: An Updated Holistic Look at Old Assumptions: Insights from three new studies on roof albedo

Session Classification: R, SUS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define roof albedo, urban heat islands, and energy efficiency and their interaction within the built environment.
  • Discuss factors to consider when determining the components of a roof system design as related to legislative or regulatory mandates, building codes, and voluntary guidelines.
  • Identify inconsistencies and shortcomings of prior research on roof albedo and employ them when reviewing future studies.
  • Summarize the benefits of various roof system choices with clients.

Session Description
Over the past 30 years, numerous studies on roof albedo and its impact on energy efficiency and urban heat islands have been conducted. New research carried out over the last three years indicates several nuances and even gaps in the three-decades-long discussion of whether a black or white roof is better. This presentation will examine three of these new studies: a study by global consulting firm ICF on the impact of roof albedo on energy efficiency; a study by ICF on the impact of reflective roofs on urban heat islands; and a critical literature review by Clemson University of previously published studies and articles on roof albedo.

Speakers

Jason Wilen, AIA, CDT, RRO
Klein & Hoffman
Chicago, Illinois

Jason Wilen joined Chicago-based Forensic Architectural and Structural Engineering firm Klein & Hoffman (K&H) in 2018 after seven years as a technical director at the National Roofing Contractors Association and 18 years with architectural, forensic, and roof consulting firms. He is a licensed architect in Illinois.

He provides leadership in K&H’s roof system and waterproofing design practice and conducts committee work related to building codes and standards, energy conservation design, and material standards. He is a voting member at ASTM and was awarded IIBEC’s Richard M. Horowitz Award, honoring the best technical article published each year in its technical journal, IIBEC Interface.

Ellen Thorp, MA, CAE
EPDM Roofing Association
Denver, Colorado

Ellen Thorp serves as executive director for the EPDM Roofing Association (ERA). She strongly believes in the collective power of individuals with shared interests to drive advocacy, education, and communication initiatives. With over 13 years of experience, she has effectively led diverse coalitions in successful advocacy outreach campaigns, engaging with prominent organizations like ASHRAE, the ICC, state regulatory agencies, and municipal governments. Her educational background includes a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s degree in education policy. Having spent 22 years in Washington, D.C., working in association and educational roles, she now resides in Denver, Colorado.

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.: Hygrothermal Efficiency of Retrofit Wall Cladding System for Existing Buildings

Session Classification: BE, EW, SUS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Introductory
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline understanding of wall enclosure rainscreen systems.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of air barriers, vapor control, and thermal control in wall assemblies.
  • Recognize the potential source of energy and water leaks in existing wall assemblies.
  • Measure and model existing wall assemblies in WUFI.
  • Illustrate rainscreen design principles to manage moisture, air, and vapor.
  • Model redesigned wall assemblies to forecast potential environmental risks.

Session Description
In part due to a lack of air and thermal control, existing buildings consume over 40% of the energy in the United States. It is important to initiate energy conservation retrofits to achieve optimal thermal design which can achieve large cuts in consumption of energy and reduce CO2 exposure. During this session, two goals for the retrofit cladding —increasing thermal efficiency and reducing condensation issues—will be discussed. Additionally, an examination of the modeling of prevalent commercial wall assemblies to benchmark initial hygrothermal controls will take place. A review of using smart rainscreen retrofit methods and how these same assemblies are reanalyzed for improvements will be conducted. Finally, a case study highlighting this process will be reviewed and presented.

Speaker

Jonnie Hasan, PE, M.Eng (Sustainable Smart Cities), BECxP, CxA+BE
Director of Engineering
Norcross, GA
Innovative Metals Co. (IMETCO)

Jonnie Hasan, M.Eng (Sustainable Smart Cities), PE, BECxP, CxA+BE, has more than 25 years of experience in commercial construction, design-build, and cladding industries. He holds a structural engineering PE, Six Sigma green belt, Building Envelope Commissioning and Project Management certification. In his position with IMETCO, he has held various roles, including building enclosure designer, WUFI analyst, manufacturing engineer, and Director of Building Envelope Products. He strives to guide clients to the most cost-effective and efficient product selection and application. He is a registered professional engineer with numerous patents related to building cladding systems and design. Mr. Hasan is an active member of ASTM, BEC (local chapter), PCI, ACI, and ASCE.

11:00 a.m. - Noon: Integrated Enclosure Detailing at the BIDMC New Inpatient Building

Session Classification: BE, EW, W
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: The attendee should have a general understanding of typical enclosure systems, including curtainwalls and different types of plaza waterproofing.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss considerations for waterproofing over a highly sensitive space.
  • Identify the challenges associated with integrating expansion joints from new to existing buildings.
  • Analyze the considerations for unitized and stick-built curtainwall construction.
  • Describe the relationship between the architectural design and enclosure detailing.

Session Description
The Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) Klarman building includes the development of a new 380,000-square-foot (sq ft) 12-story hospital. The building enclosure includes unitized and stick-built curtainwalls, terracotta cladding, metal panels, low-slope membrane roofing, and a large green roof plaza. The building abuts and connects to an existing hospital building. This presentation will explore the challenges and design considerations for a new modern hospital building, including waterproofing over highly sensitive spaces, expansion joint detailing to adjacent existing unitized construction, and unitized curtainwall detailing. We will discuss the marriage between the architectural design and the enclosure detailing, as well as the constructability challenges faced throughout the project.

Speakers

Mary Arntzen, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc.
Waltham, Massachusetts

Mary Arntzen, PE, joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. (SGH) in 2015 after several years of providing project and field engineering services in the construction industry. At SGH, she is frequently involved in designing, investigating, and rehabilitating building-enclosure systems, and has served as the project manager for various large and complex projects, often working directly with owners, architects, construction managers, and developer clients. She has extensive experience reviewing glass-and-metal curtainwall systems, windows, roofing, plaza waterproofing, cladding, and below-grade waterproofing systems. She is a board member of the IIBEC New England Chapter.

Jensen Ying, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Payette

Jensen Ying, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, joined Payette in 2013 and has over 10 years of experience in large-scale lab and healthcare projects, including specializing in exterior shell and core design. He has a growing knowledge of the design, analysis, and detailing of highly complex enclosure systems. His experience includes complex parametric facade sun shading systems, unitized and stick-built systems, and masonry rainscreens. He was instrumental in the design and execution of the Northeastern University ISEC building and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s new Klarman Building.

11:00 a.m. - Noon: The Dimension Stone Testing and Evaluation

Session Classification: T
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Attendees should have a general understanding of stone cladding and paving applications, as well as quality assurance testing.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review which testing standards are most appropriate to each application .
  • Discuss which testing standards are most appropriate to each application .
  • Specify appropriate stone testing by the phase of the construction.
  • Describe new stone testing standards that are under development and their purposes.
  • Determine if a particular stone type complies with the appropriate ASTM stone specifications

Session Description
Dimension stone is frequently specified and used in our built world as exterior and interior wall cladding, paving, and flooring. To ensure the expectations of performance are met, standardized testing for compliance with minimum physical properties, to assess durability, and to estimate in-service capacities for stone assemblies is routinely specified. Testing not only assures quality but also guides designers with respect to the appropriateness of use and detailing considerations such as anchor types and stone thickness. ASTM standardized testing procedures, including recommended testing regimens for each phase of the building process, will be discussed and outlined.

Speakers

Matthew Farmer, PE
WISS, JANNEY, ELSTNER ASSOCIATES, INC.
Falls Church, Virginia

Matthew Farmer, PE, has served as principal investigator on numerous evaluations of buildings and monuments. He has concentrated his practice in the area of masonry building enclosure systems engineering, design, investigation, analysis, and repair. Projects include institutional and commercial, as well as numerous historic landmarks. He received a bachelor of science in architectural engineering and a bachelor of environmental design from the University of Colorado; and a master of civil engineering from Cornell University. He is a registered professional engineer in Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. He is also an active member of ASTM C18 (Dimension Stone), and ASTM C27 (Cast Stone).

11:00 a.m. - Noon: Coordination, Communication & Case Studies with Lightning Protection Systems

Session Classification: R, BET, CS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the basics of a lightning protection system: components, standards, process, and key individuals.
  • Interpret the standards and codes relative to lightning protection systems to ensure utilization on a project and compatibility with roofing materials and other guidelines.
  • Explain the impact of clear coordination and communication on the integrity of the roof and lightning protection system.
  • Identify the key individuals and steps for the removal and reinstallation of a lightning protection system and effective communication strategies to ensure seamless installation for all trades.
  • Outline maintenance tasks among lightning protection contractors and other roofing trades for annual reviews and recertification.

Session Description

Establishing processes to coordinate and communicate among the trades ensures success for everyone by reducing errors, time delays, and costs. When a lightning protection system already exists, coordination becomes even more vital to a project.

By providing case studies from critical facilities to hotels, we will outline the necessary steps for the proper removal and installation process of a lightning protection system to reduce issues such as roofing damage and improper function of a system. An update on standards and codes that impact both industries will be included as we discuss assessment and specification. Beyond the installation process, we will provide suggested communication methods and timing for coordination—from the initial project assessment through maintenance—to ensure the integrity of the roof and the rooftop systems.

Speakers

Tim Harger
Lightning Protection Institute
Libertyville, Illinois

For over 35 years, Tim Harger has engaged in all aspects of the lightning protection industry: manufacturing, installation, and inspection. With these diverse experiences, he has developed a vision of growth for the lightning protection industry that involves high standards, education, and partnerships. Harger serves as the executive director of the Lightning Protection Institute/LPI and sits on the NFPA 780 Technical Committee.

Harger holds a bachelor of science in industrial technology from Iowa State University and is a certified LPI Master Installer Designer. He has also been the program manager for over 10 years with the LPI-IP, which is the industry’s third party inspection program. He is a member of AIA Chicago, IFMA, and IIBEC.

Kelley Collins
Lightning Protection Institute
Libertyville, Illinois

Kelley Collins has been immersed in business and technology for over 25 years, with diverse roles such as executive management, marketing, sales, and consulting. Currently, she is an independent consultant and spends most of her time as a director at the Lightning Protection Institute developing strategy, partnerships, and communication to support the expansion and awareness of the lightning protection industry.

Collins holds a management and marketing degree from the University of Georgia’s Terry School of Business as well as a master of business management and organizational behavior from Benedictine University and two professional certificates: Organizational Development and Management in a Technical Environment. She is a member of AIA Chicago, IFMA, and IIBEC.

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.: Roof-Mounted Solar: ROI & Best Practices

Session Classification:R, Safety, SUS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: The attendees should have a basic understanding of roofing, photovoltaic systems, and how money can influence an owner’s decision-making.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the real effects of solar orientation on system output.
  • Compare the current tax and other incentives on return on investment (ROI) & internal rate of return (IRR).
  • Evaluate initial and life-cycle costs with ROI comparison of photovoltaic (PV) on commercial roofs.
  • Describe best practices for PV design and deployment.
  • Summarize key takeaways for making decisions based on real facts and numbers regarding mounting rooftop solar.

Session Description

What roof type is ideal for photovoltaic (PV) system mounting? What about “solar zone,” roof orientation, environmental and collateral loads, system sizing, the building enclosure, and life-cycle cost analyses? All of these factors affect the sustainability and financial pro forma of the roof and PV system.

New technologies can be daunting. When it comes to PV design, small shifts in thinking can bring the things that matter into focus, producing huge savings and production efficiencies for improving the client’s overall ROI.

This presentation will review and discuss the concepts of treating the roof and PV system as a single asset with supporting ROIs and IRR. Upon this review, participants will have a better understanding of the numbers regarding the ROI and IRR.

Speaker

Rob Haddock
Metal Roof Advisory Group
Black Forest, Colorado

Rob Haddock is a metal roofing expert who has worked in the industry for five decades―first as a laborer, then contractor, forensic analyst, technical author, innovator, and founder of S-5! He is a member of NRCA, ASHRAE, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the Construction Specifiers Institute (CSI), IIBEC and ASTM. He is also a lifetime honorary member of the Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association and Metal Construction Association. Haddock innovated the concept of seam clamps for standing seam roof profiles. He has served as faculty for the Roofing Industry Educational Institute, RCI, and the University of Wisconsin. He is a recipient of numerous awards including the RCI Richard M. Horowitz Award and was a charter inductee to the Metal Construction Hall of Fame.

Mark Gies
S-5!
Boston, Massachusetts

Mark Gies is director of product management at S-5! He has nearly 15 years of solar experience and over 30 years of engineering and management experience. Prior to S-5!, he held management positions at a mounting system company and with a solar project developer. His solar expertise includes product development, operations, installation, codes and standards, and sales and business development. Gies is vice-chair of the Mounting Systems Manufacturers Committee at the Solar Energy Industry Association , a member of the Structural Engineers Association of California PV Committee, and a founding member of UL2703’s Standards Technical Panel.

 

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.: Below-Grade Concrete Protection in the Middle East

Session Classification:WP, C&S
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Advanced

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review the original design of the below-grade structure and waterproofing system.
  • Discuss how the below-grade waterproofing was constructed.
  • Explain the cause of the failure of the waterproofing system.
  • Describe how remediation was determined and designed for a solution.

Session Description
Basements in the Middle East are required to perform in one of the most aggressive environments on earth. Below-grade concrete structures are expected to keep out water from the external environment and withstand severe ground conditions where sulfate and chloride levels far exceed anything found in other areas, including Europe and America. A case study on below-grade waterproofing system failure in the Middle East will be reviewed for causes and remediation. The presentation will review the following areas.

  • The building design
  • Construction materials
  • Waterproofing selection
  • Cause of failure
  • Remediation

The presentation will also discuss the arbitration that ensued.

Speaker

Paul Buccellato, F-IIBEC, RWC, REWC, FASTM, AIA

Paul Buccellato, F-IIBEC, AIA, FASTM, CSI, is a registered architect in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and is board certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects, the New Jersey Society of Architects, the Construction Specifications Institute, a Fellow in the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants, and a Fellow of ASTM.
He has authored over 28 technical papers on waterproofing and roofing as well as five ASTM standards on roofing and material testing. He has participated in and co-authored several courses for IIBEC on the topics of roofing, waterproofing, exterior walls, and professional development.

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.: Mass Timber Moisture Protection

Session Classification:BE, Sus, W
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU|HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Building construction including walls and roofing details. Knowledge of “barrier” components and materials that are used to stop; heat flow, air flow, water (liquid), water (vapor)

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review the history of mass timber and its fast-growing use in today’s construction markets and its popular use as a panel product in building construction.
  • Examine mass timber’s unique attributes related to moisture, ability as a hygric buffer, and susceptibility to damage from elevated levels of moisture.
  • Appraise and discuss findings from field studies related to moisture levels in mass timber components during and post-construction.
  • Discuss analyses from laboratory evaluations related to mass timber moisture exposure and drying using water vapor permeable and nonpermeable protection strategies.
  • Understand which areas of mass timber construction are necessary to mitigate moisture intrusion and its effects on occupant health and safety.
  • Discuss the importance of risk management best practices for designing and installing mass timber.

Session Description
Mass timber (MT) has been used for thousands of years. However, only in recent decades has it been used as laminated panels in building construction, and this panel’s usage is growing in popularity. We will discuss publications that have studied the impact of MT moisture exposure and the need to protect the material from elevated moisture content. Laboratory test results on mass timber wetting and drying studies have shown how drying is essential to the material’s integrity. Field observations will be reviewed to understand moisture impacts during and post-construction. With its introduction as panels, new strategies must be employed for a successful installation to protect MT from moisture damage and ensure occupants’ long-term health and safety. This session will discuss moisture protection methods from manufacturing to post-construction. A risk management plan will be suggested to create a sustainable, stable structure and preserve the beauty of the mass timber building.

Speakers

Scott Wood
VaproShield
Gig Harbor, Washington

Scott D. Wood is the senior building scientist at VaproShield, providing product support on manufactured materials and investigation/testing of properties for new product development. As a building scientist, he provides technical support for the company’s representatives, and clients, and assists in the development of product technical literature. Wood has developed and presented many presentations for VaproShield and is also president of Scott Wood Associates (SWA) Consulting, providing building investigations/analysis, presentations, and level I and II certifications in building science thermography.

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.: Restoration of Historic Temple Emanu-El

Session Classification:BE, EW, RS
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Introductory
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline understanding of cast stone, historic materials, potential damage from moisture intrusion through exterior walls

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the components of a composite mass masonry wall.
  • List three failure mechanisms for coatings on concrete
  • Explain the importance of minimizing alkali-silica reaction in new concrete.
  • Describe various challenges with restoration of a historic building facade for a religious congregation with limited funding opportunities.
  • Identify observed deteriorated cast stone conditions.

Session Description
Temple Emanu-El is a historic synagogue built in 1927 with distinct cast stone facades located in Providence, Rhode Island. Over many years and through various repair campaigns the cast stone facades exhibited significant freeze-thaw damage, blistered, and peeling coatings, as well as spalled concrete. Starting in 2015, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. (WJE) collaborated with the congregation to develop, design, and execute a restoration of the sanctuary facades including replacement of the original cast stone units with new cast stone units. This presentation offers an insiders-view of the investigation, design, and challenges with recladding a historic composite mass masonry facade.

Speaker

Tara Ikenouye, AIA, CPHC
WJE
Boston, Massachusetts

Tara Ikenouye, AIA, CPHC, is an architect with master’s degrees in architecture and historic preservation. She is a senior associate with Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc. at the Boston office. She has performed condition assessments, designed repairs, restoration, and renovations for many historic buildings from the 18th, 19th, and 20th-centuries. In addition to a practice in historic preservation, Ikenouye provides enclosure consulting services for new and existing building projects with technical expertise in brick and stone masonry, concrete, windows, and roofing. She can often be found asking questions at the front of a historic house tour.

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.: Cold Weather Condensation Problems in Fully Insulated Low-Slope Roof Systems to Meet NFPA 13 Requirements

Session Classification: AB, CS, R
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: General knowledge of roof framing, general knowledge of roof system design and ventilation, and general knowledge of condensation

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the common causes of condensation problems in low-sloped insulated framed roof systems and why these systems operate differently than similar vented steep-sloped insulated systems.
  • Analyze how the use of pressurized ductwork within roof framing and how rooftop vents and exhaust fans increase the risk of condensation.
  • Explain how recent building code changes that added requirements for unvented roof systems have reduced (although have not eliminated) the risk for condensation problems in these systems.
  • Develop design and repair approaches for reducing the risk of condensation problems in these systems.

Session Description
Many low-slope roof systems installed over insulated framing spaces develop condensation problems. Unlike similar steep-slope roof systems that use convection- and wind-driven ventilation to dissipate moisture, effective venting is difficult to achieve in low-slope applications. The risk of condensation problems is especially of concern in framing spaces that are fully insulated to avoid the use of sprinklers in accordance with NFPA 13 requirements, which is the focus of this session. Interior air can flow into these insulated framing spaces through ceiling penetrations, interior walls, pressurized ductwork, and other sources. Solutions often involve using unvented roof systems that consider insulation and air barrier placement. Recent code changes have reduced (although not eliminated) the risk of condensation in unvented insulated roof framing systems. This session will review the causes of condensation in low slope insulated frame roof systems and methods for preventing them.

Speakers

Elizabeth Pugh, PE, NFRC LEAFF Certified Simulator
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc.
Northbrook, Illinois

Elizabeth Pugh, PE, NFRC LEAFF Certified Simulator, is a licensed engineer in Illinois and has participated in building enclosure assessments, investigations, and repair projects for a wide variety of building types. She is an NFRC LEAFF-certified simulator, proficient in the use of THERM and WINDOW to analyze thermal performance and localized heat transfer effects in building enclosures. She is also proficient in the use of WUFI to perform hygrothermal analyses of building enclosures. Pugh is a member of the ASTM Committee C16 Thermal Insulation.

Norbert Krogstad, AIA, NCARB
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc.
Northbrook, Illinois

Norbert Krogstad, AIA, NCARB is a licensed architect in Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, and Oklahoma. During the past 40 years at WJE, he has investigated and developed repairs to address condensation, water leakage, and structural problems in hundreds of building enclosure systems. He has lectured at numerous conferences and continuing education programs and has authored or co-authored many papers and articles on these topics. He is an active member of ASTM Committees C12 and C15 on masonry, and he was a member of the ASHRAE Task Group that developed SPC 160, “Prevention of Moisture Damage in Buildings.”

Manfred Kehrer, Dipl-Ing
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc.
Northbrook, Illinois

Manfred Kehrer, Dipl-Ing, has been involved in researching, testing, and analysis of exterior enclosure and concrete systems for more than 30 years. He has helped develop WJE’s hygrothermal laboratory and computational fluid dynamics initiative for analysis of building enclosures. Prior to joining WJE, he worked for more than 20 years at Fraunhofer IBP, Germany, in the area of hygrothermics. He was a senior building scientist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he was in charge of a variety of types of research in building science. Since 2011, Kehrer has been the Official WUFI® Collaboration Partner for USA/Canada.

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.: Condo Chronicles: Navigating Condominium Fenestration Replacement and Restoration Projects

Session Classification: BE, Windows
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW.
Knowledge Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify when a condominium board should take on a fenestration project based on age and performance of the systems, maintenance, and impact on tenants.
  • Compare the benefits and drawbacks of both fenestration replacement and existing fenestration restoration, including code implications and performance requirements.
  • Describe the common financial challenges and logistical impacts of pursuing a fenestration project at a condominium.
  • Explain common tensions between a condominium board, property manager, and individual unit owners.
  • Discuss the design professional’s role in advising/consulting on the project and risks faced by the design professional.

Session Description
Condominium fenestration replacement and restoration projects are intricate. While fenestration replacement/restoration is common for apartment buildings, executing at a condominium complex is challenging and requires careful planning and execution. Whether a condominium board opts for fenestration replacement or restoration depends on factors including logistical challenges, financial implications, ownership responsibility, code considerations, performance requirements, and impact on residents. We will review these factors from the design professional’s perspective and will discuss the complex dynamics between the property manager, condominium board, unit owner, and design professional throughout the project. This presentation is intended for design professionals who work with condominium clients and property managers.

Speakers

Kelsey Dunn, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Boston, Massachusetts

Kelsey A. Dunn, P.E. joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger in 2013 and is a senior consulting engineer in SGH’s building technology group. Dunn’s experience includes design, investigation, testing, and construction-administration for existing building repairs, restoration of historic structures, and new design building enclosures. She has consulted on many condominium restoration projects.

Megan Wilson, P.E.
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Boston, Massachusetts

Megan L. Wilson, P.E. joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) in 2018 and is a consulting engineer in their building technology group in Boston. Wilson has been involved in a variety of projects involving design, investigation, and construction administration for existing building repair projects, rehabilitation of historic buildings, and new-construction building-enclosure consulting. She has consulted on many condominium restoration projects.

Non-presenting Co-author:
Christopher Grey, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Boston, Massachusetts

Christopher N. Grey, PE, joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) in 2011 and is an associate principal in SGH’s building technology group in Boston. His experience includes investigating, rehabilitating, and designing building enclosure systems on a range of project types, from historic buildings to contemporary high-rise structures. He specializes in the design, construction administration, and in-situ testing of building enclosure systems, with a focus on design efficiency, constructability, and performance. Grey is a contributing member of the American Architectural Manufacturer Associates. He has served on several condominium boards and consulted on many condominium restoration projects, working directly for property managers.


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