Monday Education & Speakers

Each year building enclosure industry professionals from across North America and abroad gather at the IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show for education covering the latest techniques and technologies in building enclosure design, repair, and maintenance.

IIBEC Continuing Educational Credit
All registered attendees will receive Continuing Educational Hours (CEHs) based on hourly attendance at educational programs and the trade show.

AIA Continuing Educational Credit
AIA Credit has been submitted by IIBEC to AIA for approval.

Trade Show Continuing Educational Credit
Attendees will earn 2.0 CEHs for spending up to four hours on the trade show floor. Attendees who spend more than four hours at the trade show will receive 3.0 CEHs.

Listed below are the sessions that will be presented at the 2023 IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show.

Presentation Classification Codes:

  • Air Barriers: AB
  • Building Commissioning: BECxP
  • Building Enclosure: BE
  • Building Enclosure Technology: BET
  • Business/Professional Development: BPD
  • Codes & Standards: C&S
  • Exterior Wall: EW
  • Leak Detection: LD
  • Restoration: RS
  • Roofing: R
  • Waterproofing: WP
  • Wind: W
  • Safety: S
  • Sustainability: SUS

Monday, March 6

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

General Session: Wind Tunnel Testing of Edge Metal

Classification

R, BET

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Wind resistance of edge metal continues to be a concern during high-wind events. Edge metal at perimeters and corners is often determined to be the initial point of failure of roofing systems during wind events. The loss of edge-metal functionality can lead to progressive failure of a larger portion of the roof system, potentially allowing water infiltration and damage to or loss of assets in the interior.

As part of the Wind Hazard and Infrastructure Performance (WHIP) Center’s research initiatives, GAF and Florida International University (FIU) performed full-scale wind-tunnel testing of edge metal at FIU’s Wall of Wind. Four (4) full-scale wind-tunnel tests were performed using one (1) contractor-fabricated, 24-gauge L-shaped edge metal system with an 8-inch face, 4-inch horizontal flange, and a ¾-inch drip edge. Two (2) different 22-gauge cleat shapes were used—a standard 6-inch cleat and an 8-inch cleat with a 1-inch horizontal return. Four (4) different cleat-fastener locations were used—one low, one in the middle, and one high on the vertical surface, as well as one on the horizontal surface.

A discussion on the test parameters and outcomes of the different cleats and associated attachment locations will be provided. Best-practice design and installation recommendations will be given.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss and review the current code-mandated test methods (i.e., ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435 ES-1) for determining wind resistance of edge metal shapes.
  • Demonstrate the failure modes of L-shaped edge metal relative to cleat engagement, cleat shapes, and fastener locations when subjected to wind tunnel testing.
  • Compare test results of full-scale wind tunnel testing with an equivalent ES-1-tested L-shaped edge metal assembly.
  • Evaluate test methods, loading methodologies, and wind directions related to the determination of edge-metal wind-resistance capacity.

Speakers

Jim Kirby, AIA
GAF | Wilmette, IL

James Kirby, AIA, is an architect in GAF’s Building Enclosure Research + Innovation group. Kirby has a master of architecture—structures option and is a licensed architect. He has over 30 years of experience in the roofing industry and has covered low-slope, steep-slope, metal, and SPF roofing, as well as green roofs and solar applications. Kirby writes and presents about building and roofing science and does innovative research to inform all segments of the roofing industry. He is a member of American Institute of Architects, ASTM, International Code Council, IIBEC, National Roofing Contractors Association, and Western States Roofing Contractors Association.

Erica Sherman, PhD
GAF |Parsippany, NJ

Erica Sherman, PhD is an engineer in GAF’s Building Enclosure Research + Innovation group. She has a PhD in mechanical engineering with a research focus on experimental fluid dynamics and has nearly five years of experience in roofing material- and system-specific research and development. Her work has included new product development and testing in the residential roofing space. Sherman is a member of ASTM, IIBEC, and National Women in Roofing.

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Implications of Building Codes for the Repair of Buildings and Building Enclosures

Classification

BE, C&S, RS

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Building codes can be complicated and often subject to the interpretation of design and public officials alike. These interpretations can have significant effects on the scope and cost of repairs to existing buildings and building enclsoure components, such as roofs, windows, and cladding. In this presentation, learners gain an understanding of the basic requirements of building codes and how those requirements relate to existing buildings and building enclosures during the investigation and/or repair process. In many jurisdictions, the International Existing Building Code governs the remediation of damage to a structure or enclosure components, which are classified as “repairs.” Repairs can often be completed in like kind and quality of materials without triggering code upgrades for egress or thermal efficiency. The case studies highlight real-world examples of code analysis pertaining to egress interpretations for repair/replacement of window units in Florida hurricane zones and unsafe/dangerous roof deck conditions that existed prior to wind damage at a warehouse in the Midwest. In both cases, a combination of adopted codes governed and detailed code analyses will be presented to the learners to understand the differences and when each applies.

Learning Objectives

  • Review the building code history and the adoption process.
  • Evaluate how building codes relate to existing buildings during the repair process.
  • Discuss when repair work triggers code upgrades and/or compliance with new building code standards.
  • Identify the definitions and ramifications of unsafe and dangerous conditions and substantial structural damage.

Speakers

Alan Mullenix, PE
Envista Forensics | Plymouth, MN

Alan Mullenix, PE, is a senior project engineer with Envista Forensics with over 15 years of experience in the practice of civil and structural engineering. He received his bachelor of science in civil engineering from Georgia Tech and a master of science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Mullenix has experience in commercial design and in the nuclear and petrochemical industries. At Envista, he conducts forensic investigations involving structural failures, building enclosure deficiencies, construction defect claims, catastrophe responses, and fire damage to residential, commercial, and marine buildings and structures.

Erik Wetzler
Envista Forensics | Deerfield, IL

Erik Wetzler has nearly 20 years of experience as a structural engineering expert where he has directed and executed a wide range of forensic investigations, structural analyses, and litigation support cases. His practice is concentrated in tall towers, office and retail, education, warehouses, and historic buildings throughout the US, UK, Dubai, New Zealand, and globally. His experience includes the evaluation and assessment of earthquakes, hurricanes, structural and vessel collapses, building enclosure failures, and a variety of common and complex property loss scenarios.

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
Resilience and the Impact on Roofing

Classification

R, S

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

In the roofing industry the materials, assemblies, installation, and warranties should be well-considered, but special attention should be placed on meeting the International Building Code (IBC). A roofing specification is a road map for the roof assembly to meet the building code based on performance and quality. Though this might seem clear-cut, the difficulty comes from understanding the changes within the building code, its criteria, and industry changes. Design professionals face questions, such as: Are the listed ASTM standards within the IBC for material, testing, and roof assemblies current, or have they become obsolete, deleted, or replaced? ASCE 7 now has multiple versions that are used in different states/organizations. Which should be used and when? FM Global has changed its criteria. How does this fit in?

These questions, combined with the pressures on the design professional, such as the demand on turnaround time and services, increase the liability of knowing the IBC requirements and the limitation of educating emerging professionals on material mechanics. The result can be a conflict between code and specification.

This presentation will offer a clearer understanding of the building code, its criteria, and the critical changes that could affect the specification and the installation of a roofing assembly.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain variances in the definition of the term “resilience” that exist among different organizations.
  • Review of the standards (ASTM, ASCE, FM, etc.) and how they are applied beyond the building codes.
  • Evaluate case examples of real-world projects that incorporate a redundancy with consideration of worse-case weather events.
  • Construct a checklist of standards and codes that should be considered based on specific concerns of the building owner and/or the use of the building.

Speaker

Brian Chamberlain
Carlisle Construction Materials | Carlisle, PA

Brian Chamberlain has been with Carlisle Construction Materials since 1987. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, with a bachelor’s degree in the science of architectural design. Since joining Carlisle, Chamberlain has been assisting architects, consultants, and specifiers in developing special engineered roofing, focusing on performance and sustainability assemblies. He is part of a team that is responsible for system configurations, details development, and code testing. He has been involved in numerous technological presentations throughout the US, Canada, and overseas. Chamberlain is a member of IIBEC, the Construction Specifications Institute, and the Single Ply Roofing Institute. He has 35 years of experience in the roofing industry.

General Session: 10:15 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Estimating the Residual Life of Aged TPO Roofs

Classification

R, S

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roofing membranes have been used in the US low-slope roofing industry as single-ply membranes for over 20 years and have seen widespread acceptance. While the total percentage of TPO low-slope roofs in service today is still unknown, it can be assumed to be substantial since the market share was around 30% in 2010 and is now above 50%. As those existing TPO roofs age, it is important for the building owner and roof consultant to understand their eventual failure modes and to be able to estimate the residual lifetime. An understanding of the failure modes can contribute to better repair and maintenance planning while that of a residual lifetime can assist with future replacement budgeting.

This presentation describes a new study of aged TPO roofs across the United States. A comparison of the laboratory-based accelerated aging performance of new TPO versus aged TPO roof properties is shown so that the eventual failure modes of TPO can be better understood. The relationships between roof inspection observations versus roof cut performance are shown such that estimates of residual life can be derived.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the process of TPO aging and its failure modes.
  • Explain how TPO performs, specifically in regard to how it can be repaired.
  • Assess aged TPO roofs from observations to advise the building owner as to either the repair or replacement options.
  • Recognize whether roof cuts are required and how to evaluate such cuts to estimate the residual life.

Speaker

Thomas Taylor
GAF | Parsippany, NJ

Thomas Taylor is the building and roofing science advisor for GAF. This position is focused on the technical attributes and analysis of the various elements within a commercial roof assembly. He is a frequent presenter at both national and regional industry meetings. He has over 25 years of experience in the building products industry, all working for manufacturing organizations in a variety of new product development roles. He has a PhD in chemistry and holds approximately 35 patents.

General Session: 11:00 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Recertification Resurgence—Mitigating Risk in our Nation’s Older Structures

Classification

BE, R, S

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

On June 24, 2021, tragedy struck the structural engineering community as the Champlain Towers South condominium partially collapsed in Surfside, Florida. From the rubble of this collapse sparked a strong resurgence in the demand for building condition assessments and repairs. Most notably, the 40-year recertification process has come to the forefront of the building diagnostics industry, and the frequency and detail of these assessments have been the subject of much debate. Understanding the interdependence between the building enclosure and the structural system is paramount to the efficacy of the recertification process. Industry-proven strategies should be employed during the assessment and repair phases. Conversely, the longevity of the building enclosure starts with design. Best practices for selecting and designing the appropriate enclosure system should be implemented to avoid premature distress. The collapse triggered changes in inspection requirements at county and state levels. Understanding these changes will help building owners plan for current and future repair and maintenance costs. These changes will no doubt necessitate more frequent assessments. Advancements in assessment technology, including drone surveys and robotic systems capable of automating visual reviews, will aid in the increased demand and will help engineers maintain an efficient process while mitigating risk in aged buildings.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the components of 40-year recertification and changes at the county and state level after the Surfside collapse.
  • Identify assessment methods for determining the condition of existing enclosures.
  • Outline best practices for the design of new buildings to prevent premature distress.
  • Discuss potential code changes and the future of building assessment technology.

Speakers

Tricia Fitzgerald, PE, LEED AP
Walter P Moore & Associates | Miami, Florida

Tricia Fitzgerald, PE, LEED AP, is an engineer and senior project manager in our Diagnostics Group with more than 20 years of experience in structural engineering, building enclosure consulting, and forensic consulting. Fitzgerald’s expertise includes evaluating, assessing, and designing repairs for structural systems and building enclosure components. She develops work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for concrete restoration, waterproofing, stucco and EIFS cladding, and window rehabilitation projects.

Tarcisio Noguera PE, LEED AP, WMI
Walter P Moore & Associates Diagnostics | Pembroke Pines, FL

Tarcisio Noguera, PE, LEED AP, WMI, THLV2, is an engineer and senior project manager in Walter P Moore Diagnostics who focuses on existing structures. He has more than 15 years of domestic and international experience in the field of building enclosures and forensic engineering. Noguera expertise includes assessing and designing repairs for distress related to moisture management, roofing systems, and below-grade waterproofing on concrete substrates. He has also developed work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for roofing, waterproofing, restoration, and rehabilitation projects. Noguera has performed multiple 40-year recertifications to buildings in Florida’s Miami Dade and Broward County.

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.
Durability, the Forgotten Pillar of Sustainability

Classification

BE, S

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

This presentation will review the recent literature regarding the relationship between the resilience and sustainability of our buildings with the durability of building enclosure systems. Building enclosure durability is essential for limiting critical structural and enclosure-related failures that could have significant operational, financial, comfort, or health-related implications on the building and its occupants. Moreover, with the frequency and severity of major weather events on the rise, it is crucial that engineers stay up to date on new requirements being adopted in building codes and technical standards to address these changes. Building durability also has a critical importance on the overall sustainability of the building. Less durable systems need to be replaced or repaired more often, leading to additional embodied and operational energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Topics to be covered in this presentation include key considerations, standards, and testing requirements regarding the durability of various enclosure systems; the relationship between durability and lifecycle GHG emissions; and, recommended design and construction practices to improve the durability and resilience of the buildings enclosure systems. 

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate the effects of climate change and worsening weather events on building enclosure durability.
  • Discuss the relationship between durability and lifecycle GHG emissions.
  • Summarize key considerations, standards, and testing requirements regarding the durability of various enclosure systems.
  • Explain recommended design practices to improve the durability and resilience of the building enclosure systems.

Speaker

Brandon Gemme
Read Jones Christoffersen | Toronto, Ontario

Brandon Gemme is a building science engineer at RJC’s Building Science and Restoration division located in Toronto, Canada. He received his Bachelor of Applied Science in civil engineering from the University of Toronto in 2016, with a minor in sustainable energy systems and a certificate of engineering business. Gemme is responsible for evaluations, investigations, and remediation of building enclosure systems, as well as the implementation of rehabilitation and preventative maintenance programs. He has been involved in several deep energy retrofit projects and has gained valuable experience in the design, modeling, and management of these projects.

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Midcentury Modern Masonry Mishaps

Classification

EW, R

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Many of the buildings constructed following World War II up to 1970 can generally be categorized as midcentury modern. During that time, new technologies allowed masonry to be used in such a manner to achieve minimalist expressions with an emphasis on functionality, organic, and geometric forms and mixing of materials, all characteristics common to the mid-century modern style. The widespread use of thin stone cladding systems, stack bonded brick, flat terra cotta panels, concrete, and glass block was the masonry pallet used by designers during this period. As these facades have aged, issues related to durability, serviceability, and water management have developed, which were uncommon within traditional masonry facades. The evaluation, maintenance, repair, and restoration of these architectural gems is generally governed by the Secretary of the Interior Standards considering many of these buildings have surpassed 50 years of service and thus are categorized as “historic,” often qualifying for the National Register of Historic Places. This presentation will break down the typical materials and systems used in masonry construction during the midcentury modern era. An exploration of commonly occurring issues with these structures and review of repair approaches, all supplemented with short case studies, will also be provided.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe materials and cladding systems that were typically used during the period between 1940 and 1970.
  • Discuss examples of the mechanism of deterioration and distress in midcentury cladding systems.
  • Examine the repair and approaches that could be considered for various conditions that occur in the midcentury cladding systems.
  • Evaluate potential new issues that could develop in midcentury cladding systems as they continue to age.

Speakers

Edward Gerns, RA, LEED, AP
WJE | Chicago, IL

Edward Gerns is a project manager and project architect/engineer experienced in the investigation and repair of deteriorated conditions in existing buildings. He performs evaluations of brick, terra cotta, and stone masonry; assesses causes of collapse or distress in existing cladding systems; and has inspected numerous structures damaged by wind, ice, snow, and fire. Gerns has overseen the preparation of repair documents for contemporary and historic buildings and structures.

Leah Ruther
WJE | Grand Haven, MI

Leah Ruther has been involved in numerous projects related to both structural engineering and architecture. Her typical responsibilities have included the investigation and analysis of existing and damaged structures, the development of technical repair and rehabilitation documents, and construction observations. Ruther has performed a variety of structural analyses on steel, concrete, masonry, and wood structures. She has assisted with several non-destructive investigations and has completed multiple condition assessments.

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.
There’s a Lot of Hot Air in Consulting. What’s It All About?

Classification

BPD

Article

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Geared toward students and emerging professionals, this session focuses on the fundamental control layers of the building enclosure. The presentation introduces the importance of water management, moisture and air movement (vapor), and thermal continuity. Concepts of vapor drive, thermal breaks, mechanical systems integration, and building enclosure commissioning will be introduced. A discussion on various enclosure details to establish tools for collaboration will be included. This session is highly interactive to prepare the new or emerging professionals within the industry, with baseline insights to help engage them in more advanced sessions throughout the convention. 

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the importance of moisture, air, vapor, and thermal continuity.
  • Discuss the risks associated with discontinuities.
  • Identify control layers and pinpoint discontinuity.
  • Review the importance of consulting and collaborating among architects, engineers, and consultants.

Speakers

Jennifer Keegan, AAIA
GAF | Amber, PA 

Jennifer Keegan is the director of Building and Roofing Science for GAF, focusing on overall roof system design and performance. She has over 20 years of experience as a building enclosure consultant specializing in building forensics, assessment, design, and remediation of building enclosure systems. Keegan provides technical leadership within the industry as the chair of the ASTM D08.22 Roofing and Waterproofing Subcommittee as the IIBEC Education Committee chair, and as an advocate for women within the industry as an executive board member of National Women in Roofing and a board member of Women in Construction.

Darbi Krumpos
Trinity | ERD | Seattle, WA 

Darbi Krumpos has over 25 years of experience at Trinity | ERD. She graduated from Seattle University with a bachelor of science in mathematics. She is a certified documents technologist and holds two building enclosure commissioning certificates. Project support includes code compliance and warranty support, coordination of private and public projects worldwide, litigation and remediation for condominium associations and owners, investigation, and research related to construction deficiencies and litigation, specification writing, and contract administration for new construction and remediation for both commercial and residential projects, building enclosure commissioning, field testing, and quality assurance and quality control program management.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Lightning Protection Systems: Coordinating with the Building Enclosure

Classification

BE, R, BET

Article

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Whether it’s a modern high-rise or a historical building, there are considerations with structural design and building materials that should be understood for the successful installation of a lightning protection system. This presentation will outline the process for early collaboration among construction trades to ensure a proper design and installation. The presenters will also provide a clear understanding of how to address various systems that may be encountered during a reroofing project.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the fundamentals of a lightning protection system: how they work, adherence to the latest national standards, and proper installation procedures.
  • Outline the main considerations during the design and installation of a properly installed lightning protection system. This includes, structure design, material choices and sizes, and the role of a certified individual throughout the process.
  • Introduce possible building (oddly shaped, rooftop terraces, historical structures) challenges that may occur during the installation of the system and offer resolutions.
  • Provide suggestions to coordinate with different construction trades.
  • Summarize the importance of inspection by a third party to ensure proper installation of the lightning protection system.

Speakers

Tim Harger, Executive Director
The Lightning Protection Institute Libertyville, Illinois

Tim Harger is an industry expert with an entrepreneurial spirit. For over 35 years, he has engaged in all aspects of the lightning protection industry: manufacturing, installation, and inspection. With these diverse experiences, he developed a vision of growth for the lightning protection industry that involves high standards, education, and partnerships. Harger’s desire to maintain high standards comes from his involvement with ANSI accreditation and the ISO certification processes. Furthermore, he understands the value of partnerships to gain different perspectives and to learn best practices, which can be seen in his involvement in the NFPA 780 Committee and industry associations such as American Institute of Architects and IIBEC. Harger holds a bachelor of science in industrial technology from Iowa State University. He also is a certified LPI Master Installer Designer. He has served as the executive director of the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) for just over two years and has been the program manager for the LPI-IP, which is the industry’s third-party inspection program, for over 10 years.

Kelley Collins, Director of Business Development and Communications
The Lightning Protection Institute 
Libertyville, Illinois

Kelley Collins has been immersed in the science and technology industries for over 25 years, with diverse roles such as executive management, marketing, sales, and consulting. She was intrigued with the science and the opportunity for growth in the lightning protection industry and joined LPI just over two years ago. Currently, Collins works with LPI developing strategy, partnerships, and communication to support the expansion and awareness of the lightning protection industry. She attended the University of Georgia’s Terry School of Business with a degree in management and marketing. She holds a master’s in business management and organizational behavior from Benedictine University and two professional certificates: organizational development and management in a technical environment. She is also the co-developer and instructor for the science communication program for PhD students at Northwestern University.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Prefabricated Wall Panels: Lessons Learned

Classification

EW

Proceedings

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Over the last 10 years, the use of prefabricated wall panels has become a common option for exterior wall systems. These systems range from backup panels (e.g., metal studs, with pre-applied exterior sheathing and the air/water barrier) to completed wall panels complete with cladding (e.g., finished exterior insulation finishing systems) or masonry veneer exterior system) to unitized curtain wall assemblies. Prefabricated wall panels allow for increased quality control of the prefabricated components and increased construction speed, but prefabrication is not a solution for all buildings or exterior wall types.

Many prefabricated assemblies require substantial work and care in the field to address panel-to-panel joints or field conditions, thus limiting the benefits of prefabrication. This presentation will discuss what types of buildings and structures are best suited for prefabricated wall panels, particularly opaque cladding systems. A discussion on the principles of prefabrication and the typical prefabrication process, including coordination and development during the design phase, typical shop drawing and submittal process, prefabrication, and erection/assembly will be provided. The presenters will also discuss project-specific lessons learned, providing both a contractor and consultant perspective.

Learning Objectives

  • Define prefabricated wall panels.
  • Compare varying types of prefabricated wall panels.
  • Summarize the principals of prefabricated wall panels.
  • Discuss strategies to determine if prefabricated wall panels are appropriate for a given project.

Speakers

Lee Cope, PE
Southern Wall Systems | Suwanee, Georgia

Lee Cope is a licensed Professional Engineer who spent 19 years with Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc., where he developed extensive experience in detailing and proper installation of facade systems, air barriers, window systems, waterproofing, and the interfaces of various enclsoure components. In 2018, Cope joined Southern Wall Systems to run their restoration division and assist in their new construction divisions. He is a voting member of ASTM Committee C11 on Gypsum and Related Building Materials and Systems.

Nicholas Floyd, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. | Houston, TX

Nicholas Floyd is a licensed professional engineer who joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. (SGH) in 2003 and specializes in the design, investigation, and remediation of building enclosures. His past and current projects include enclosure investigation, design, and construction administration of several large public structures, educational facilities, and commercial properties. Floyd has experience designing and investigating contemporary cladding systems, as well as fenestration, roofing, and waterproofing.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

The Business Case for Challenging the Status Quo and Improving Employee Culture

Classification

BPD 

Article

This course has been approved for 1 IIBEC Continuing Education Hour

Session Description

Advocates of diversity equity and inclusion principles understand that diverse workplaces have the opportunity to increase productivity and innovation, reduce employee turnover, and foster the ability to connect with a larger customer base. These concepts are well supported by research, but business leaders and diversity advocates are still promoting a version that is far too simple. Just increasing the number of traditionally underrepresented people does not automatically produce benefits. Instead, business leaders need to move beyond thinking of diversity as a simple quota. Progressive and forward-thinking owners and leaders should be committed to actionable items that lead to authentic change. This presentation will touch on diversity, equity, and inclusion but will mainly focus on how and who building enclosure consultants can implement to create an inclusive culture that has benefits for all.

This presentation will be based on the most current DEI research and supplemented with practical information and examples by IIBEC members who have used DEI principles in their offices and/or companies. It will also include specific action items and tangible resources that participants can download and start using right away, including a demonstration of REAL Roofing—a DEI education course that has been custom-made for the roofing industry. 

Learning Objectives

  • Define and explain the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Evaluate the most current forward-thinking research on diversity, equity, and inclusion practices.
  • Use proper terminology and vernacular when discussing diversity, equity, and inclusion issues.
  • Identify actionable items and resources to incorporate into business practices and employee handbooks.

Speakers

Ellen Thorp
National Women in Roofing | Denver, CO

Ellen Thorp knows that powerful things happen when people who share a common interest come together for advocacy, education, and communication. In addition to providing leadership and advocacy work for other construction-related trade associations, Thorp has grown NWiR to 2000 members, 40 sponsors, and programs that have engaged thousands of people. She has a bachelor’s degree in political science, and a master’s degree in education policy, and has earned the rigorous Certified Association Executive designation. After spending 22 years in Washington, D.C., working for associations and educational institutions, she and her family now live in the Denver area.

Melissa Walker
Johns Manville  Denver, CO

Melissa Walker is the owner services marketing manager for the Roofing Systems division at Johns Manville (JM). Walker started with JM in the Performance Material Group in 1998, shortly after joining the Roofing Division. In 2001 she briefly left Johns Manville and moved to Miami, Florida, taking a position with Apache Products (now Dyplast). Returning to Denver in 2005 brought her back to the Roofing division at JM. In her career with the company, she has held various positions of increasing scope and responsibility, including customer service advocate and lead, pricing administrator, account management leader, and product management. Walker earned a bachelor of fine arts from Metropolitan State College and a master of business administration with an emphasis in operational management from Regis University, both in Colorado.