Education and Speakers

Each year building enclosure industry professionals from across North America and abroad gather at the IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show for education covering the latest techniques and technologies in building enclosure design, repair, and maintenance.

IIBEC Continuing Educational Credit
All registered attendees will receive Continuing Educational Hours (CEHs) based on hourly attendance at educational programs and the trade show.

AIA Continuing Educational Credit
AIA Credit has been submitted by IIBEC to AIA for approval.

Trade Show Continuing Educational Credit
Attendees will earn 2.0 CEHs for spending up to four hours on the trade show floor. Attendees who spend more than four hours at the trade show will receive 3.0 CEHs.

Listed below are the sessions that will be presented at the 2023 IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show.

Presentation Classification Codes:

  • Air Barriers: AB
  • Building Commissioning: BECxP
  • Building Enclosure Technology: BET
  • Business/Professional Development: BPD
  • Codes & Standards: C&S
  • Exterior Wall: EW
  • Leak Detection: LD
  • Restoration: RS
  • Roofing: R
  • Waterproofing: WP
  • Wind: W
  • Safety: S
  • Sustainability: SUS

Friday, March 3 – Auxiliary Seminars

(Additional fees apply. Learn more here.)

Use of UAS and Reality Capture Technology in Transforming the Future of Enclosure Assessment (3 sessions)

Session 1 of 3: Drone-based 3-D Photogrammetry in Building Enclosure Consulting Practice

Session Description

Recommendations for the use of drone-based 3-D photogrammetry modeling in building enclosure consulting practice will be provided. Discussion includes the different types of drones, drone program requirements, and recommendations, as well as the photogrammetry processing software and computer requirements. Demonstrations of example workflows and case projects will be shown to further enhance the learners’ experience.

Speakers

Jenn Boelter
Building Envelope Professionals Group LLC |Oregon, WI

Jenn Boelter is director of virtual modeling and chief pilot for Building Envelope Professionals Group LLC (BEPG). Boelter provides oversight and management of the BEPG drone program. Boelter routinely conducts 3-D photogrammetry data acquisition and modeling and continues to lead BEPG’s “drone to BIM” workflow development. She also provides laser scanning, point cloud development, and the integration of laser scanning and photogrammetry 3-D meshes.

Thomas Gernetzke, F–IIBEC, RBEC
Building Envelope Professionals Group LLC |Oregon, WI

Thomas Gernetzke, F–IIBEC, RBEC, is the principal consultant for Building Envelope Professionals Group LLC. Gernetzke is a past-president of IIBEC, was influential in the creation of the IIBEC Emerging Professionals Committee, and helped initiate the RCI–IIBEC Foundation Convention Scholarship program. He is currently serving as the chairman of the IIBEC Advocacy Committee and is a member of the IIBEC Jury of Fellows.

Session 2 of 3: Introduction to LiDAR and Its Uses in Building Enclosure and Beyond

9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Classification

BET

Session Description

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is a remote sensing method that allows for the creation of accurate and detailed three-dimensional models of objects or spaces. LiDAR has the ability to resolve variations in the millimeter scale, collect millions of data points in a single scan, and be quickly collected from a number of platforms. This technology has been utilized in a variety of industries and continues to grow in use with new applications.

In this seminar, an introduction to LiDAR technology and its uses in the facility engineering realm is presented. A brief discussion on the concept of LiDAR, its field methods, and current uses within the industry will be followed by several project examples where LiDAR was used successfully. These examples have applications in the building enclosure discipline. In addition, other example projects where LiDAR has been used, including where it has been integrated with geophysical data, will be discussed to provide a complete overview of its current use and to facilitate discussion of other potential applications.

Learning Objectives

  • Introduce the concept of LiDAR and its applications within the facility engineering field.
  • Discuss and provide examples of LiDAR and the different types of data collection.
  • Outline the different uses of LiDAR within the BEC science field.
  • Identify when it is appropriate to use LiDAR within the industry.

Speakers

Michael Cobb
Walter P Moore & Associates | Houston, TX

Michael Cobb is an engineer in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group. His experience focuses on the field of building enclosure consulting and restoration engineering. Cobb’s expertise includes evaluating and designing repairs for distress related to precast facades, concrete structures, and roofing systems. He is a certified Part 107 drone pilot. He has also developed work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for waterproofing and structural restoration and rehabilitation projects.

Kimani Augustine, PE
Walter P Moore & Associates | Houston, TX

Kimani Augustine is a senior project manager and principal in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group. He has been in the industry since 2004 and has experience in diversified aspects of enclosure diagnostics, including conducting field visits and assessments of existing structures requiring retrofit or renovation. Augustine has led efforts on many building enclosure and parking restoration projects. He has taken the lead on several significant roof renovations, including project scopes that involve the assessment and repair of multiple roofing systems.

Session 3 of 3: Eye in the Sky: Mitigating Facade Access Risks Through Unmanned Aircraft System Aerial Imagery

11:15 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Classification

BET, EW

Session Description

Facade access has always been a high-risk endeavor for engineers, architects, consultants, and contractors. While regulation has reduced risks associated with facade access through the requirements associated with intermediate support anchors and tracks, many existing buildings have not had their facade access and fall arrest systems updated since their original construction under pre-existing code.

Walter P Moore & Associates has utilized drone imagery and data collection to capture facade information on a variety of projects to mitigate risks to their engineers. These efforts have reduced the amount of time spent on suspended and mobile scaffolds while still using traditional access methods to review areas of the building at arm’s length. Systematic drone aerial imagery capture also allows for reduced time on site, as imagery of the building can be captured in a measure of hours rather than days. Working in tandem with arm’s-length reviews, this methodology provides engineers with the ability to perform limited up-close assessments of the most critical areas of the building while reducing the amount of time required to be suspended on scaffolding.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify hazards that are present on an existing building facade.
  • Assess access methods used to review the conditions safely and informatively on a facade.
  • Describe data capture mechanisms and methods for proper documentation of drone imagery.
  • Discuss updated workflows for received data and the development of automated systems.

Speaker

Robert Hendricks, PhD
Terracon | Dallas, TX

Robert Hendricks, PhD is the senior staff geophysicist for the facilities group in Terracon’s Dallas office. During the course of his research, Hendricks has made use of multiple geophysical and 3-D modeling technologies, including light detection and ranging, or LiDAR. Since Hendricks joined Terracon in 2017, he has been leading an initiative to integrate LiDAR technology into Terracon’s repertoire. He has conducted numerous building enclosure works (both with and without geophysical and LiDAR technologies) as well as a cornucopia of LiDAR-based analysis projects.

Hazard Identification and Solutions for Compliance with Rooftop Fall Protection Regulations

This course is capped at 30 people.

** This auxiliary seminar will take place at the 3M facility in Pasadena, Texas where the learner will be able to incorporate the training they receive in the classroom into hands-on training.

Buses leave at 7:45 a.m. and return after 11:30 a.m.

This auxiliary seminar will take place at the 3M facility in Pasadena, Texas so the learner can incorporate the training they receive in the classroom into hands-on training.

Roof Consultants who understand fall protection regulations and products that create compliance can be a resource for building owners. Roof Consultants conduct site visits every day and understanding fall protection can give them a significant competitive advantage. Understanding the most common fall hazards and the ways to mitigate them not only protects workers and reduces preventable death in the workplace but it also reduces exposure to building owners and employers. Knowing the law helps everyone involved.  While compliance may seem costly, non-compliance is potentially incalculable.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and explain five significant changes required by the 2017 OSHA 1910 Subpart D update.
  • Discuss three significant terminology updates created by this regulatory change and revisions to the relevant consensus standard.
  • Examine the Rooftop Hazard Assessment using the APRONS method.
  • Review common areas of non-compliance in the rooftop environment and place them into the APRONS methodology.
  • Outline each regulatory change and common area of non-compliance and identify and explain multiple solutions that create compliance.
  • Demonstrate a routine Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) inspection and identify improperly attached or damaged devices.

Speakers:

Cody Atkinson

Kevin Kelpe

Dustin Schneider

Eric Thill

Kynan Wynne

Saturday, March 4

General Session: Resilience – What does that mean for the Design of Buildings?

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Speaker:

Donald (Don) Scott, PE, SE, FSEI, FASCE
PCS Structural Solutions

General Session: Stucco on an Island not so Far, Far Away: Directly Bonded Stucco Failure Investigation

8:45 a.m.– 9:30 a.m.

Classification

EW

Session Description

Shortly after completion in 2010, the portland cement plaster facade was observed to be failing on a five-story landmark commercial property in the British Virgin Islands located in the business district of Road Town. Numerous attempts to correct the deficiencies had proven unsuccessful. A request was made by the owner to evaluate the facade components to determine the probable cause(s) of failure and to present the owner with options for repair/replacement to provide an effective system. This presentation will focus on the approach to fieldwork, challenges related to working outside of the United States, petrographic analysis, and evaluation processes for investigating Portland Cement stucco. Additionally, recommendations for repair and/or replacement strategies, including best practices for proper design and installation of directly bonded portland cement plaster facades, will be presented.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the challenges of fieldwork outside of the United States.
  • Understand petrographic analysis uses in facade evaluation.
  • Summarize the investigation and evaluation of Portland cement stucco.
  • Recommend ways to repair and replace Portland cement stucco using industry-accepted best practices.

Speakers

Vu The Nguyen
Terracon | Charlotte, NC

Vu Nguyen is a senior project manager with 25 years of experience in the building enclosure industry. Nguyen has provided design, consultation, commissioning, survey, and management of various types of building enclosure projects. His daily responsibilities include maintaining design production schedules and construction budgets, coordinating pre-bid and preconstruction conferences and progress meetings, and evaluating submittals. Nguyen enjoys forensic projects where he is able to investigate a long-term building enclosure failure by conducting destructive test cuts, detecting the source of the problem, and ultimately offering an innovative design solution that best suits his clients’ needs.

Stewart Swing, RRO, RWC, RRC, EI
Terracon | Lexington, NC

Stewart Swing is an instrumental senior staff engineer with eight years of field experience and demonstrated strong communication, time management, and leadership skills. In his first year in the field, he worked with a foreman learning the trades of waterproofing. Since then, he has developed a notable enthusiasm for waterproofing, continuing to accumulate knowledge of building enclosures. His daily responsibilities include the preparation of specifications and drawings, contract administration, and construction observations. Swing enjoys forensic projects where he is able to investigate a long-term building enclosure failure by tearing a structure apart, detecting the source of the problem, and ultimately offering an innovative design solution that best suits his clients’ needs.

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.
Digging Deep: Waterproofing Deep Foundations for New Construction

Classification

WP

Session Description

The deeper the foundation, the higher the risk for water infiltration. Below-grade waterproofing systems are a critical part of the overall building enclosure and should be carefully selected to properly protect the structure and interior below-grade space. This presentation will discuss the challenges specific to deep foundation waterproofing as well as provide best practices for various below-grade elements with which the waterproofing will interface. New construction project examples and scenarios will be included to elaborate on the challenges, discussions, and solutions.

Learning Objectives

  • Apply key principles used in determining below-grade waterproofing selections.
  • Identify project decisions that are critical to the development of below-grade waterproofing systems for deep foundations.
  • Describe an appropriate below-grade waterproofing system based on varying site conditions and structural foundation types.
  • Predict construction challenges that may arise during the installation of below-grade waterproofing systems for deep foundations. 

Speaker

Amos Chan
Walter P Moore & Associates | Atlanta, GA

Amos Chan is an associate in Walter P Moore’s Diagnostics Group. His project experience in building enclosure consulting, commissioning, and renovation includes the design of below-grade waterproofing systems, vapor barriers, facade and cladding systems, air/water barriers, windows, commercial fenestration, plaza waterproofing, and roofing systems. Chan has also extensively reviewed the field installation and testing of these building enclosure systems to ASTM and American Architectural Manufacturers Association standards, for commercial office, mixed-use, health care, higher education, government, hospitality, multifamily residential, and industrial buildings.

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.
Assessment of Thermal Bridging of Fasteners through Insulated Roof Assemblies

Classification

R

Session Description

Roof fastener systems are comprised of metal screws and plates used to attach roof membranes, cover boards, and insulation. These systems can have an adverse impact on the thermal performance of roof assemblies, as the components create thermal bridges that bypass the thermal resistance of insulation in the roof assembly. This in turn allows heat to escape at an accelerated rate, flowing outward in cold weather and inward in warm weather. While the thermal performance of 3-D thermal bridges can be numerically simulated with software tools, such simulations are time-consuming and need to be verified by laboratory tests to validate the underlying assumptions made during the simulation.

During this presentation, participants will learn how the research team used a series of laboratory tests to compare the thermal performance of physical models of simple roof assemblies under controlled laboratory environmental conditions with computer simulations of the same conditions. Assemblies were comprised of high-density polyisocyanurate cover board, polyisocyanurate insulation, and steel deck, tested both with and without #12 and #15 fasteners and plates. In this session, the results of both physical models and computer simulations are presented and compared. The outcome is an experimentally validated computer simulation approach that will enable consultants to evaluate a broader range of roof assemblies and roof fastener configurations.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the physics behind the adverse impact of fasteners and plates on the thermal performance of roof assemblies.
  • Identify the limitations of both physical models and computer simulations of real-world roof assemblies.
  • Describe the impacts of fasteners and plates on the thermal performance of roof assemblies as identified in physical models and computer simulation studies.
  • Recognize the potential application of this study’s conclusions to the evaluation of additional roof assemblies and modification of existing codes and standards.

Speakers

Elizabeth Grant, PhD, RA
GAF | Blacksburg, VA

Elizabeth J. Grant is director of building enclosure research + innovation at GAF. She is a member of IIBEC, National Women in Roofing, Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, and American Institute of Architects. Grant wrote Integrating Building Performance with Design: An Architecture Student’s Guidebook, and has published in IIBEC Interface, the Journal of Architectural Engineering, the Journal of Green Building, Professional Roofing, Architectural Science Review, and Buildings & Cities. Before joining GAF, she was an associate professor at Virginia Tech’s School of Architecture + Design, researching the building enclosure and offering courses in architectural design, environmental design research, and environmental building systems.

Georg Reichard, PhD
Virginia Tech | Blacksburg, VA

Dr. Georg Reichard is a professor and department head of building construction and an associate director in the Myers-Lawson School of Construction at Virginia Tech. His research deals with experimental and numerical methods, simulation, and data modeling, in particular in the area of building sciences related to building enclosures and environmental systems. In his current research, he focuses on building performance, enclosure durability, disaster resilience, energy efficiency, and integrated decision-making for retrofit solutions in connection with different control strategies and building materials. Reichard holds a master’s and a doctoral degree in civil engineering from Graz University of Technology, Austria.

Sarah Rentfro
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. | Washington, DC

Sarah Rentfro joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc.’s (SGH) building technology group in 2014. As a member, she studies how building enclosures interact with the surrounding environment through heat, air, and water vapor transfer analysis and performance modeling of enclosure assemblies and their transitions. She also specializes in the design and integration of complex building enclosure systems including roofs, exterior walls, contemporary cladding assemblies, and fenestration with an emphasis on performance efficiency and constructability.

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.
Fifty Years of Roof Consulting

Classification

BE

Session Description

This presentation will discuss a firsthand account and historical overview of the roof consulting industry over the last 50 years. As part of this history, many newly introduced roofing systems were problematic and added to the roof failure area of roof consulting. As a result, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, an emphasis on technical research on both conventional and newly introduced roofing systems fueled the roof consulting industry. The history of initial startups, changes, and events that affected both the roof consultant and roofing industry, as well as considerations concerning the future direction of the industry, will be discussed.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the history of roof consulting, key industry leaders, and how the industry began.
  • Assess how the roof consulting industry has changed over the last 50 years.
  • Examine the advances in roof science technology and the changes in roofing systems.
  • Discuss potential future directions of the roof consulting industry. Provide examples on a wide array of projects over the years.

Speaker

Jim Koontz, RRC, PE
Jim D. Koontz & Associates Inc. (JDKA) | Hobbs, NM

Jim D. Koontz, PE, RRC, has been involved in the roofing industry since 1960. His career includes experience as a roofer, estimator, manager of a roofing company, consultant, lecturer, and researcher. As a consultant, Koontz has worked in over 40 states, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Australia. Clients include numerous agencies of the city, state, and federal governments, large insurance companies, universities, developers, material manufacturers, contractors, and architects.

11:00 a.m.– noon
Building Fire Safety: No Singular Solution; It Takes a Village

Classification

BE

Session Description

Exterior wall assemblies serve many functions. Architects must design buildings that are energy efficient, manage bulk water, and reduce air leakage in addition to meeting the fire performance standards required by the International Building Code (IBC). It is important to recognize that making changes to the exterior wall design may trigger the need to retest or reconsider all the wall functions. It is also important to understand that fire safety is not dependent upon the presence or absence of any one material or wall configuration. Performance testing such as NFPA 285 is a tool for gaining an understanding of how assemblies will perform. While fire containment and compartmentalization are often supported by performance testing, they are also part of a multilayered approach to fire safety that must include prevention, detection, occupant protection, and extinguishment.

Learning Objectives

  • Examine how modern wall designs must meet fire performance requirements alongside thermal transmission and the management of moisture and air leakage.
  • Explain the influence of project details on fire performance requirements for exterior wall assemblies.
  • Discuss the compatibility of IBC sections and requirements and the implications they may have on exterior wall assemblies.
  • Assess NFPA 285 and the engineering judgments involved.
  • Review the fire safety of building stock as the result of common principles and multiple integrated layers of design, fire protection, and fire mitigation.

Speakers

Eric Banks
E.W. Banks Consulting LLC | Houston, TX

Eric Banks is a technical consultant specializing in the development, physical and fire testing, codes and standards compliance, and certification of building products and their associated applications with an emphasis on foam plastics. Banks has over 20 years of experience in these areas, working with and for both product manufacturers and certification agencies. He is actively engaged in codes-and-standards development work. 

Justin Koscher
Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association | Mount Pleasant, SC

Justin Koscher is the president of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), a trade association that serves as the voice of the rigid polyisocyanurate insulation industry and a proactive advocate for safe, cost-effective, sustainable, and energy-efficient construction. Before joining PIMA in January 2017, he served as a director at the American Chemistry Council’s Center for the Polyurethanes Industry. Koscher obtained his BA from Illinois Wesleyan University and JD from DePaul University College of Law.

11:00 a.m.– noon
Enhancing Building Efficiency and Resilience with Solar-Reflective Walls

Classification

BET, EW, S

Session Description

Buildings play an integral role in urban heat island (UHI) mitigation through the use of solar-reflective surface materials. Though reflective—or “cool”—– roofs are one commonly used solution, research has demonstrated that solar-reflective walls are also effective at mitigating UHIs and reducing cooling loads. In this session, the discussion includes the importance of solar-reflective walls and how they can help reduce urban heating and building energy usage as well as a review of applicable building codes. A summarization of the latest research on the impacts of solar-reflective walls will be included along with voluntary programs that specify the solar reflectivity of exterior walls. An overview of the world’s first third-party rating system for the radiative performance of exterior wall products will also be provided.

This presentation will introduce the concept of a solar-reflective wall, describe how exterior walls can help reduce urban heating and building energy use and summarize the latest research on the impacts of solar-reflective walls. The discussion will provide an overview of building codes and voluntary programs that specify the solar reflectivity of exterior walls and explain how third-party ratings help building energy consultants identify solar-reflective wall products. Finally, the presentation will provide an overview of the world’s first third-party rating system for the radiative performance of exterior wall products.

Learning Objectives

  • Outline the value of solar-reflective walls beyond reducing a building’s cooling demand.
  • Identify the four key benefits of solar-reflective walls.
  • Infer the value of third-party product ratings and the role they play in building codes and voluntary programs.
  • Utilize the Cool Roof Rating Council Rated Wall Products Directory to search for products that qualify for various codes, ordinances, and voluntary programs.

Speakers

Audrey McGarrell
Cool Roof Rating Council | Portland, OR

Audrey McGarrell is the project coordinator of the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that develops scientifically supported methods for evaluating and labeling the radiative properties of roofing and exterior wall products. McGarrell has been with the CRRC since March 2021 and oversees the CRRC Wall Product Rating Program and the organization’s Technical Committee. She also manages the CRRC’s social media accounts and supports education and outreach efforts. McGarrell holds a bachelor of arts in Spanish, a master of public administration, and a LEED Green Associate credential

Sarah Schneider
Cool Roof Rating Council | Portland, OR

Sarah Schneider is the deputy director of the Cool Roof Rating Council, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that develops scientifically supported methods for evaluating and labeling the radiative properties of roofing and exterior wall products. She has been with the organization since 2013 overseeing the organization’s policy and standards development, accreditations, code advocacy, and outreach and education activities. Schneider has a bachelor of science in environmental science and a master’s degree in public policy.

11:00 a.m.– noon
Increasing Sustainability in the PVC Low-Slope Roof Market Through Recycling

Classification

R, S

Session Description

End-of-life recovery of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) roof membranes began in 2006. While its adoption across the industry has grown, it has been limited by a lack of demand. With increased corporate environmental, social, and governance (ESG) initiatives, the sustainability of this practice is being recognized as providing a much greater value to building owners, specifiers, and other design professionals. The Chemical Fabrics and Film Association Vinyl Roofing Division implemented an industry-wide program in 2022 to expand the recovery and recycling of end-of-life PVC roofs with participation across the value chain. This initiative intends to minimize landfilling and recapture the polymer content for its next life. Examples of PVC membrane roof recycling programs and projects will be presented, and their benefits discussed. This presentation provides an opportunity for building owners, contractors, consultants, specifiers, and designers to consider how to benefit from including recycling in the bid process to meet the sustainability objectives of the owner and building team.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the benefits of recovery and recycling of PVC single-ply roof membranes.
  • Summarize what green building credits are available in the US for recycled content roofs and end-of-life roof recovery.
  • Identify candidate installations and proper roof prep and tear-off for successful recovery and recycling.
  • Examine ways to get recycling into a project bid.

Speaker

Jennifer Oblock
Chemical Fabrics and Film Association | Cleveland, OH

Jennifer Oblock is an account executive at Thomas Associates, a trade association management company headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio. Since 2013, she has been immersed in association duties, working closely with associations of all sizes. Oblock represents the Chemical Fabrics and Film Association, where she serves as its executive secretary. Her experience covers the full range of association activities, including all aspects of project and meeting management and serving as the principal liaison to association directors and officers. She holds a bachelor of arts degree in business with a concentration in marketing from Mercyhurst University.

Sunday, March 5

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Historic Industrial Building Reuse and the Building Enclosure

Classification

BE, RS

Session Description

Prior to the pervasive use of mechanical interior conditioning, building enclosures were designed and constructed where building finishes accommodated drying the building enclosure to both the exterior and interior environments. This is especially true in historic industrial buildings, namely mass masonry structures. In the past couple of decades, many of these building types have been converted into modern living spaces. Conditioning the interior environment and the application of moisture-sensitive interior materials can result in undesirable condensation and the potential for biological growth on building interiors. The existing building enclosure construction can create conditions where raising the enclosure R-values to modern code-required values can be problematic. Installed components can conflict with the locations in which building science indicates the insulation should be installed. Existing construction can present conditions that, due to the manner of assembly or time-induced deterioration, are difficult to seal against air infiltration.

In this presentation, case studies will be discussed to demonstrate how these project issues were addressed. Attention will be given to the continuity of the air, water, and thermal control layers given the existing, historic building conditions. Designers, researchers, contractors, and building owners will be especially interested in the diagnostic testing procedures and, design-driving results that will be presented and discussed.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the types of historic building enclosure construction that may present issues with modern interior environmental needs.
  • Compare how the air, water, and thermal layers may need to be assessed differently when designing repurposed historic industrial buildings.
  • Examine ASTM testing procedures to ensure the successful application of specific details are recommended on historic repurpose projects.
  • Assess which details need special attention when designing repurposed, historic industrial buildings.

Speakers

Paul Bielicki, AIA, NCARB, LLED, AP
Terracon Inc Consultants | Charlotte, NC

Paul Bielicki is a licensed architect and a graduate of Lawrence Technological University and the University of Tennessee with degrees in architecture and structural engineering. Since 2020, Bielicki has worked in the facilities division at Terracon Consultants Inc. His experience includes building enclosure evaluation, peer review, construction administration, and building design. He has managed or technically developed/designed a variety of building projects including 500,000 square feet offices, performing arts centers, and health care centers. Research interests include whole building and building component reuse.

William G. Lehne, PE, CIT
Terracon Inc Consultants | Charlotte, NC

William G. Lehne, PE, CIT, attended Clemson University from 2011 to 2014, graduating with an undergraduate degree in civil engineering with an emphasis in structures. He received his professional engineering license in the states of North and South Carolina in 2020 and received his Level 1 – Certified Infrared Thermographer certification in 2021. He has received training on whole building air testing through Retrotec as well as training on utilizing WUFI Pro. Lehne’s work experience includes the design of light-framed wood residential and multifamily structures; building evaluations for insurance claims; water testing; whole building air testing; infrared scans for building enclosure and roofing evaluations; roof design; roof and building enclosure consulting; assisting with construction litigation and masonry evaluation for restoration of historic structures. He has a passion for evaluating and designing buildings and enjoys getting to know and assisting the people who utilize them.

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Brick by Brick—Traditional and Unconventional Masonry Restoration Strategies

Classification

EW, RS

Session Description

Exterior masonry wall design and construction practices have evolved to include mass, transitional, barrier, and cavity walls. As the inventory of these buildings age into the future, repair and/or restoration will be required. It’s not a question of if, but rather when and how.

Although time-tested, traditional repair strategies are suitable for many projects, other lesser-established unconventional strategies can be considered to improve exterior wall performance. Over-cladding or exterior coating application can be implemented to fundamentally transform the exterior wall into a cavity wall or barrier wall, respectively. Unconventional interior repairs, including the use of crystalline waterproofing technologies, urethane foam, or variable vapor retarders in conjunction with insulation can also be considered to improve wall performance with respect to water leakage, air infiltration, and/or thermal properties. This presentation will cover both traditional options and “outside-the-box” strategies for masonry restoration and repair projects. This presentation will also include discussions related to building science, air and vapor transport related to traditional and unconventional strategies, and several case studies.

Learning Objectives

  • Define masonry wall types as mass walls, drainage walls, or barrier walls.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of building science associated with masonry walls and the impacts of various restoration strategies.
  • Review various traditional and unconventional masonry restoration options to overcome issues associated with water leakage, air infiltration, and thermal performance.
  • Describe advanced technologies that can be applied to renovations associated with masonry walls.

Speakers

Gloria Frank, EIT
Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc. | Willowbrook, IL

Gloria Frank is a member of the structural engineering staff at Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc., and is enrolled with the state of Illinois as an engineer intern. She is engaged in condition assessment, field investigation and testing, litigation support services, and documentation of structural components and distressed structures. In addition to structural engineering projects, Frank assists with testing for building enclosure condition assessment and repair design of historic structures. While earning her master’s degree in structural engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she worked as a teaching assistant under Professor Emeritus German Gurfinkel, assisting with courses in structural design of reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete.

Patrick Reicher, REWC, REWO, SE
Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc. | Willowbrook, IL

Patrick Reicher is a principal with Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc. He has 17 years of experience with the forensic investigation, evaluation, and repair design of existing building enclosures, and building enclosure consulting and commissioning for new construction projects. Reicher is a structural engineer in Illinois and a professional engineer in several states. He is also a Registered Exterior Wall Consultant, Registered Exterior Wall Observer, Certified Construction Specifier, and Certified Construction Contract Administrator. He currently serves on several committees and task forces for IIBEC and the Fenestration and Glazing Industry Alliance.

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mysterious Moisture Marks: Assessment of Water Stains at Window Glazing

Classification

EW

Session Description

The threat of water intrusion within a building enclosure will raise different levels of concern, including aesthetic, environmental, and threats to the structural integrity. The appearance of water stains upon the interior surfaces of the window glazing system may raise alarms for the unit owner or building stakeholders. However, not all signs of water stains are the same. An assessment of the reported area of staining should include evaluations of all reasonable sources. Whether condensation from the inside or active water intrusion from the outside, the presentation will touch upon the most common scenarios and sources. A discussion regarding the conditions that may or may not be attributed to window glazing will take place. Expectations of the ability of watertightness performances based on the window type or configurations will be presented. Additionally, a discussion regarding the invasive and emerging noninvasive methods such as thermal imaging analysis via drone technology will occur.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize waterproofing specifications and detailing of glazing systems, particularly those in common with window glazing types and configurations.
  • Identify typical signs and causes of water stains found at window glazing systems that may or may not be related to water intrusion.
  • Describe the methodology of window inspections with a focus on the use of drones, and analyze the use of thermal imaging.
  • Evaluate common repair practices and emerging new products for watertightness / weathertightness methodology.

Speakers

Patrick St. Louis, LEED
Thornton Tomasetti | Fort Lauderdale, FL

Patrick St. Louis, LEED Green Associate, is a senior project director with Thornton Tomasetti (TT) in the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, office, in the Forensic, Renewal, and Property Loss practice. St Louis has been with TT for over nine years with a primary focus on forensic and renewal architecture. He has his bachelor’s degree from Florida Atlantic University.

Krishna Sai Vutukuru, PhD
Thornton Tomasetti | Fort Lauderdale, FL

 Dr. Krishna Sai Vutukuru, PhD is a senior engineer at Thornton Tomasetti Inc. (TT) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Vutukuru has been with TT for one year and specializes in built environment vulnerability to extreme wind events such as hurricanes, wind-driven rain, downbursts, and tornadoes. He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi, as well as master’s and doctorate degrees in civil engineering from Florida International University.

3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Basics of Thin Brick Wall Systems

Classification

EW

Session Description

Several thin brick wall systems have been developed for the construction industry, ranging from composite thin brick precast panelized walls to rail-supported thin brick rain screens. Each of the thin brick wall systems has benefits and drawbacks that require careful consideration when considering climate, code, and adjacent wall assemblies. When the wrong thin brick system is chosen for a specific application, or the system is composed of using the wrong elements, problems can occur during or soon after construction. Our experience investigating problems with thin brick wall systems and navigating design challenges during construction has shown the importance of understanding the variety of systems that exist and when one system may want to be selected versus another. Understanding how each system functions is also essential to understanding how the detailing of the systems varies and the importance of matching the right details to the right system.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate the basic material properties of thin brick systems and how they are similar and different from conventional brick systems.
  • Learn to differentiate between barrier thin brick and rain screen thin brick systems and how this affects the selection of other system components, i.e., weather barriers and insulation.
  • Discuss climate considerations for thin brick system selection.
  • Determine how codes such as NFPA 285 can drive system selection.

Speakers

Mary Donlon
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. | Waltham, MA

Mary Donlon is a senior consulting engineer who joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. in 2014 as a member of the building technology group. She has extensive experience in contemporary walls. Other areas of experience include industrial rope access, roofing, panelized wall systems, plazas, windows, and flooring.

Matthew Pitzer, AIA, LEED BD+C
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. | Waltham, MA

Matthew R. Pitzer is an architect and senior project manager at Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. and a member of the building technology group in Waltham, Massachusetts. He has experience in the design, investigation, evaluation, restoration, and construction administration of historic and contemporary buildings. Pitzer specializes in the investigation and evaluation of existing building enclosure systems, including historic and contemporary masonry, waterproofing, cladding systems, windows and curtain walls, and roofing.

Nichole Thomas
Seal Building Enclosure LLC | Houston, TX 

Thomas is a graduate of Prairie View A&M University School of Architecture. She has experience working with well-respected architecture firms in the Houston area and has been involved in various aspects of the design and construction process, including drafting, specification writing, construction administration, sustainability, and building performance evaluation.

3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Change Is in the Air (Barrier!)

Classification

EW, AB

Session Description

Air barrier requirements for commercial buildings are undergoing substantial changes in the 2022 ASHRAE 90.1 Standard and the 2024 IECC. Continuous air barriers have been required in most buildings for a number of years. Recently the model commercial energy codes, ASHRAE 90.1 Standard and the 2024 IECC have been updated to provide more specific and stringent requirements for buildings. This presentation will provide expert insight from two individuals who have been engaged in the code development process for years and were specifically involved with the air leakage updates in both the ASHRAE 90.1 Standard and the International Energy Conservation Code. The air barrier updates include clarifications to the whole building performance testing methods and stringency, design phase requirements, material and assembly requirements, and on-site installation verification requirements. We will discuss the appropriateness of applications and the interaction between the building and energy code requirements. A discussion on new code development updates, design-based applications, and construction best practices will also take place.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the impact of air barrier systems on energy efficiency.
  • Recognize the changing building and energy codes and their interaction with building enclosure systems.
  • Evaluate how to implement an air barrier strategy to comply with the code and owner performance requirements.
  • Explain how specific examples and air barrier systems can be applied to current and future project designs.

Speakers

Benjamin Meyer, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP
Siplast | Mosely, VA

Benjamin Meyer, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, is the building enclosure business director with Siplast. His previous experience includes enclosure consultant principal, technical management, research, and education for enclosure products, commercial design, real estate development and construction management on a range of projects that included residential, educational, offices, and DuPont industrial projects. Industry positions include voting member of the ASHRAE 90.1 Envelope and Project Committees, LEED Technical Committee member, past LEED Materials (MR) TAG, and director of the Air Barrier Association of America. Meyer has MBA, BS, and M. Arch degrees from the University of Cincinnati.

Theresa Weston, PhD
Holt Weston Consultancy | Richmond, VA

Theresa Weston, PhD, is the president of the Holt Weston Consultancy, providing building science-focused expertise to increase sustainability and resiliency of the built environment. Weston is on the executive committee of the ASTM Committee on the Performance of Buildings and chairs the Subcommittee on Air Leakage and Ventilation. At ASHRAE, she is the immediate-past chair of the Residential Buildings Committee and immediate-past-Chair of the Standard for Energy Efficient Design of New Low-Rise Residential Buildings (90.2), and past chair of the Technical Committee on Building Materials and Building Envelope Performance. Weston is active in the International Code Council code development process.

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Concept of Design Considerations

Classification

BE, BPD

Session Description

Design reviews of plans and specifications are a critical step in the development of project manuals and “construction set” drawings. Design considerations, input from all stakeholders (owners, contractors, design professionals, and consultants) is added in the process as the project progresses from the original schematic design to a completed set of documents. There are several key resources (SpecsIntact, CSI, etc.) that provide key elements for the document development process. This presentation will address how to improve in-house standards for practice in design considerations and development and will focus on the uniformity of design documents over time and in different offices. Recommendations for minimum standards and compliance will be offered as a benchmark for design development.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify strategies to improve in-house standards for practice in design considerations.
  • Explain the importance of uniformity when multiple personnel or locations are involved in the process of design considerations.
  • Discuss the minimum standards that follow industry guidelines and exceed the minimum requirements of codes.
  • Provide minimum recommendations/comments when involved in design review and commissioning.

Speaker

Richard L. Cook Jr. F–IIBEC, RBEC, RRO, REWO, CCS, LEED, CSRP, SC ACEM
The Building Envelope Enclosure Group | Hanahan, SC

Richard L. Cook Jr. is the principal managing partner of the Building Envelope Enclosure Group. His expertise is in building enclosure consulting and design services. He received his bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from the Citadel in 1984. His credentials include FRCI, RBEC, REWO, RRO, CCS, CSRP & LEED AP.

Cook has been a member of IIBEC since 1988 and is a past president. He has chaired committees, published articles, and developed and taught dozens of courses for IIBEC as well as universities. He has authored numerous papers on the subject of building enclosures.

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Oh Hail! Metal Roofs, Hail Impact, and Long-Term Performance

Classification

R, S

Session Description

For several years, the insurance industry has been addressing an important question: what is considered cosmetic damage vs. functional damage when assessing hail impact on low-slope metal roofing? Cosmetic damage due to hail is often excluded from coverage. However, more recently, the distinction between cosmetic and functional damage has been challenged by forensic experts potentially basing their opinions on unsubstantiated claims of reduced service life and the performance of a dimpled roof. Does moisture retention or microfracture within a hail divot really diminish roof life?

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association has recently completed two research projects on the effects of hail on coated steel roofing systems. The projects, which evaluated the coating damage due to roll forming of 55% Al-Zn-coated steel roof panels and the water ponding drying rates for simulated hail impact divots on 55% Al-Zn-coated steel roof panels, provide much-needed information to define the differences between “cosmetic” and “functional” damage. This presentation provides background on the hail damage issue and presents the results of the recently completed research, which will come to bear on the definition of functional damage going forward. It is essential to properly evaluate hail impact on coated steel roofing.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the three common concerns regarding the long-term performance of hail-impacted 55% Al-Zn-coated steel roof panels.
  • Explain the empirical and scientific corrosion behavior of 55% Al-Zn coatings on steel roof panels.
  • Discuss the approach to apply results of drying rate and coating fracture studies to categorize hail impact damage as cosmetic or functional with dimensional delineations.
  • Define appropriate evaluation criteria for 55% Al-Zn coating damage due to hail impacts.
  • Defend your assessment of hail-damaged, 55% Al-Zn-coated steel roof panels.

Speakers 

Ron Dutton
Ron Dutton Consulting Services LLC | Annapolis, MD

Ron Dutton is the president of Ron Dutton Consulting Services. Dutton provides technical services for product development, failure analysis, and product training for the metal construction and appliance industries. With 40 years of experience in metallic-coated steel products and a strong emphasis on 55% Al-Zn alloy-coated sheets, Dutton has served in various organizations, such as the National Coil Coating Association (NCCA) Building Products and Residential Roofing Task Forces. He chaired the North American Zinc Aluminum Coaters Pre-Painted Building Inspection Committee and chaired the board for the Zinc Aluminum Coaters Association. Dutton holds BS and MS degrees in metallurgical engineering and materials science from Drexel University and Lehigh University.

Robert Haddock
S-5 | Colorado Springs, CO

Robert Haddock is a metal roofing expert who has worked in the industry for five decades―first as a laborer, then contractor, forensic analyst, technical author, innovator, and founder of S-5. He is a member of NRCA, ASHRAE, the American Society of Civil Engineers, Construction Specifiers Institute, and ASTM. He is also a lifetime honorary member of Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association, and Metal Construction Association. Haddock innovated the concept of seam clamps for standing seam roof profiles. He has served as faculty for Roofing Industry Educational Institute, IIBEC, and the University of Wisconsin. He is a recipient of numerous awards including the IIBEC Richard M. Horowitz Award and was a charter inductee to the Metal Construction Hall of Fame.

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Six Frequently Misunderstood Topics Related to Commercial Building Enclosures

Classification

BE

Session Description

Discussions between architects, building enclosure consultants, product manufacturers, and contractors frequently center around common misunderstandings regarding commercial building enclosures. This presentation will address five common topics using case studies, specific project examples, and citations from previous literature. These topics are: 1) The importance of relative humidity, dew point, and how they are managed in a building enclosure and the difference between a static analysis and dynamic analysis (WUFI). 2) How the permeability of individual layers of the building enclosure versus moisture flow through an entire assembly. 3) The importance of aligning the control layers at penetrations such as windows and how to ensure continuity at important interfaces such as the roof and foundation. 4) An analysis of when structural sheathing is needed in commercial construction compared with wood-framed construction and when structural sheathing can be used to improve the efficiency of a building schedule. 5) An overview of NFPA 285 testing, the information it provides, and its importance for the safety of buildings. Finally, the presenters will discuss a bonus topic citing specific examples of how results found via lab test methods can set unrealistic expectations for in-field conditions. 

Learning Objectives

  • Define the terms “relative humidity,” “dew point,” and “vapor permeability,” and describe how each can impact a project.
  • Explain NFPA 285 and how fire-rated assemblies are critical components for life safety.
  • Discuss how and when to incorporate structural sheathing in a project.
  • Review how to properly interpret and apply lab testing of products and assemblies to field conditions

Speaker

Andrea Wagner-Watts
DuPont Performance Building Solutions | East Aurora, NY

Andrea Wagner-Watts is the commercial application leader for DuPont Performance Building Solutions. Wagner-Watts has worked in the construction industry for over 15 years, where she has successfully helped develop multiple sealants and air/water barrier system solutions. Currently, she focuses on improving the overall performance of the building enclosure through application innovation, and new product development. She has published on building science, interfaces, durability, and resiliency. Wagner-Watts holds two patents, is a LEED Green Associate, and is the Air Barrier Association of America Technical Committee Chair.

Monday, March 6

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Wind Tunnel Testing of Edge Metal

Classification

R, BET

Session Description

Wind resistance of edge metal continues to be a concern during high-wind events. Edge metal at perimeters and corners is often determined to be the initial point of failure of roofing systems during wind events. The loss of edge-metal functionality can lead to progressive failure of a larger portion of the roof system, potentially allowing water infiltration and damage to or loss of assets in the interior.

As part of the Wind Hazard and Infrastructure Performance (WHIP) Center’s research initiatives, GAF and Florida International University (FIU) performed full-scale wind-tunnel testing of edge metal at FIU’s Wall of Wind. Four (4) full-scale wind-tunnel tests were performed using one (1) contractor-fabricated, 24-gauge L-shaped edge metal system with an 8-inch face, 4-inch horizontal flange, and a ¾-inch drip edge. Two (2) different 22-gauge cleat shapes were used—a standard 6-inch cleat and an 8-inch cleat with a 1-inch horizontal return. Four (4) different cleat-fastener locations were used—one low, one in the middle, and one high on the vertical surface, as well as one on the horizontal surface.

A discussion on the test parameters and outcomes of the different cleats and associated attachment locations will be provided. Best-practice design and installation recommendations will be given.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss and review the current code-mandated test methods (i.e., ANSI/SPRI/FM 4435 ES-1) for determining wind resistance of edge metal shapes.
  • Demonstrate the failure modes of L-shaped edge metal relative to cleat engagement, cleat shapes, and fastener locations when subjected to wind tunnel testing.
  • Compare test results of full-scale wind tunnel testing with an equivalent ES-1-tested L-shaped edge metal assembly.
  • Evaluate test methods, loading methodologies, and wind directions related to the determination of edge-metal wind-resistance capacity.

Speakers

Jim Kirby, AIA
GAF | Wilmette, IL

James Kirby, AIA, is an architect in GAF’s Building Enclosure Research + Innovation group. Kirby has a master of architecture—structures option and is a licensed architect. He has over 30 years of experience in the roofing industry and has covered low-slope, steep-slope, metal, and SPF roofing, as well as green roofs and solar applications. Kirby writes and presents about building and roofing science and does innovative research to inform all segments of the roofing industry. He is a member of American Institute of Architects, ASTM, International Code Council, IIBEC, National Roofing Contractors Association, and Western States Roofing Contractors Association.

Erica Sherman, PhD
GAF |Parsippany, NJ

Erica Sherman, PhD is an engineer in GAF’s Building Enclosure Research + Innovation group. She has a PhD in mechanical engineering with a research focus on experimental fluid dynamics and has nearly five years of experience in roofing material- and system-specific research and development. Her work has included new product development and testing in the residential roofing space. Sherman is a member of ASTM, IIBEC, and National Women in Roofing.

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Implications of Building Codes for the Repair of Buildings and Building Enclosures

Classification

BE, C&S, RS

Session Description

Building codes can be complicated and often subject to the interpretation of design and public officials alike. These interpretations can have significant effects on the scope and cost of repairs to existing buildings and building enclsoure components, such as roofs, windows, and cladding. In this presentation, learners gain an understanding of the basic requirements of building codes and how those requirements relate to existing buildings and building enclosures during the investigation and/or repair process. In many jurisdictions, the International Existing Building Code governs the remediation of damage to a structure or enclosure components, which are classified as “repairs.” Repairs can often be completed in like kind and quality of materials without triggering code upgrades for egress or thermal efficiency. The case studies highlight real-world examples of code analysis pertaining to egress interpretations for repair/replacement of window units in Florida hurricane zones and unsafe/dangerous roof deck conditions that existed prior to wind damage at a warehouse in the Midwest. In both cases, a combination of adopted codes governed and detailed code analyses will be presented to the learners to understand the differences and when each applies.

Learning Objectives

  • Review the building code history and the adoption process.
  • Evaluate how building codes relate to existing buildings during the repair process.
  • Discuss when repair work triggers code upgrades and/or compliance with new building code standards.
  • Identify the definitions and ramifications of unsafe and dangerous conditions and substantial structural damage.

Speakers

Alan Mullenix, PE
Envista Forensics | Plymouth, MN

Alan Mullenix, PE, is a senior project engineer with Envista Forensics with over 15 years of experience in the practice of civil and structural engineering. He received his bachelor of science in civil engineering from Georgia Tech and a master of science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Mullenix has experience in commercial design and in the nuclear and petrochemical industries. At Envista, he conducts forensic investigations involving structural failures, building enclosure deficiencies, construction defect claims, catastrophe responses, and fire damage to residential, commercial, and marine buildings and structures.

Eric Wetzler
Envista Forensics | Deerfield, IL

Eric Wetzler has nearly 20 years of experience as a structural engineering expert where he has directed and executed a wide range of forensic investigations, structural analyses, and litigation support cases. His practice is concentrated in tall towers, office and retail, education, warehouses, and historic buildings throughout the US, UK, Dubai, New Zealand, and globally. His experience includes the evaluation and assessment of earthquakes, hurricanes, structural and vessel collapses, building enclosure failures, and a variety of common and complex property loss scenarios.

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
High-Rise Building Cladding Attachment Trials and Tribulation

Classification

EW, AB, S

Session Description

Continuous insulation is critical for energy-efficient, durable buildings, but is challenging to achieve due to cladding attachment devices (clips, Z-girts, lath, ties, etc.) that must be fastened through the continuous insulation and water-resistive barrier (WRB). This leads to R-value loss and potential water/air leakage. The industry research regarding this subject is predominantly focused on thermal bridging in low-rise, wood-framed construction. However, little guidance exists within the industry for cladding attachment detailing in high-rise construction, typically comprised of metal framing with gypsum sheathing and subjected to more significant exposure.

A team from Terracon Consultants, JE Dunn Construction, and Tremco Waterproofing have collaborated on this research initiative, which will consist of fourteen 8-foot by 8-foot mockups, each metal-framed with gypsum sheathing and a distinct WRB technology (mechanically fastened, fluid-applied, etc.). Each mockup contains 24 attachment devices fastened to the mock-up with a distinct detail (e.g., wet set, shimmed, top-sealed, etc.), and all mock-ups are to be air tested per ASTM E283 and water tested per ASTM E331. This presentation will discuss the building performance implications of each cladding attachment/detailing/WRB type and the results of the air and water leakage testing to demonstrate the performance of each detail for each cladding attachment and WRB type.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain industry standards, and limitation of industry standards, for air and water leakage testing of attachments.
  • Discuss best practices for detailing common cladding attachments such as brick ties, Z-girts, metal lath, and clip and rail systems, as determined by mock-up testing.
  • Describe the effect of WRB technology (mechanically fastened, fluid-applied, etc.) on cladding attachment detailing and performance, based on mock-up testing.
  • Formulate practical strategies to maximize the performance of wall design with respect to heat, air, and water management.

Speakers

Keith Simon, AIA
Building Exterior Solutions LLC, a Terracon Company | Austin, TX

Keith Simon is an expert in building enclosure technology and addresses the critical and often unmet need for ensuring and improving building performance, resilience, and durability by guiding design teams, educating future architects, and facilitating interdisciplinary exchange. Simon joined Building Exterior Solutions LLC. (a division of Terracon) in 2014. He is a Certified Passive House Consultant, Legacy LEED AP, Building Enclosure Commissioning Provider, and Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. His experience includes peer review, design assistance, durability analysis, construction administration, testing, and forensics of building enclosure issues, and he is the building enclosures practice lead.

Marcy Tyler
Tremco Commercial Sealants and Waterproofing | Beachwood, Ohio

Marcy Tyler has over 25 years of experience in the building enclosure industry and has extensive insight into what makes a building perform. After achieving joint bachelor’s degrees in chemical engineering and chemistry, Tyler began her career as a technical representative for Tremco. Her unique perspective and commitment to excellence have led to her becoming Tremco’s director of building science, where she uses her skills to guide various testing and product development initiatives.

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
Resilience and the Impact on Roofing

Classification

R, S

Session Description

In the roofing industry the materials, assemblies, installation, and warranties should be well-considered, but special attention should be placed on meeting the International Building Code (IBC). A roofing specification is a road map for the roof assembly to meet the building code based on performance and quality. Though this might seem clear-cut, the difficulty comes from understanding the changes within the building code, its criteria, and industry changes. Design professionals face questions, such as: Are the listed ASTM standards within the IBC for material, testing, and roof assemblies current, or have they become obsolete, deleted, or replaced? ASCE 7 now has multiple versions that are used in different states/organizations. Which should be used and when? FM Global has changed its criteria. How does this fit in?

These questions, combined with the pressures on the design professional, such as the demand on turnaround time and services, increase the liability of knowing the IBC requirements and the limitation of educating emerging professionals on material mechanics. The result can be a conflict between code and specification.

This presentation will offer a clearer understanding of the building code, its criteria, and the critical changes that could affect the specification and the installation of a roofing assembly.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain variances in the definition of the term “resilience” that exist among different organizations.
  • Review of the standards (ASTM, ASCE, FM, etc.) and how they are applied beyond the building codes.
  • Evaluate case examples of real-world projects that incorporate a redundancy with consideration of worse-case weather events.
  • Construct a checklist of standards and codes that should be considered based on specific concerns of the building owner and/or the use of the building.

Speaker

Brian Chamberlain
Carlisle Construction Materials | Carlisle, PA

Brian Chamberlain has been with Carlisle Construction Materials since 1987. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, with a bachelor’s degree in the science of architectural design. Since joining Carlisle, Chamberlain has been assisting architects, consultants, and specifiers in developing special engineered roofing, focusing on performance and sustainability assemblies. He is part of a team that is responsible for system configurations, details development, and code testing. He has been involved in numerous technological presentations throughout the US, Canada, and overseas. Chamberlain is a member of IIBEC, the Construction Specifications Institute, and the Single Ply Roofing Institute. He has 35 years of experience in the roofing industry.

10:15 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Estimating the Residual Life of Aged TPO Roofs

Classification

R, S

Session Description

Thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roofing membranes have been used in the US low-slope roofing industry as single-ply membranes for over 20 years and have seen widespread acceptance. While the total percentage of TPO low-slope roofs in service today is still unknown, it can be assumed to be substantial since the market share was around 30% in 2010 and is now above 50%. As those existing TPO roofs age, it is important for the building owner and roof consultant to understand their eventual failure modes and to be able to estimate the residual lifetime. An understanding of the failure modes can contribute to better repair and maintenance planning while that of a residual lifetime can assist with future replacement budgeting.

This presentation describes a new study of aged TPO roofs across the United States. A comparison of the laboratory-based accelerated aging performance of new TPO versus aged TPO roof properties is shown so that the eventual failure modes of TPO can be better understood. The relationships between roof inspection observations versus roof cut performance are shown such that estimates of residual life can be derived.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the process of TPO aging and its failure modes.
  • Explain how TPO performs, specifically in regard to how it can be repaired.
  • Assess aged TPO roofs from observations to advise the building owner as to either the repair or replacement options.
  • Recognize whether roof cuts are required and how to evaluate such cuts to estimate the residual life.

Speaker

Thomas Taylor
GAF | Parsippany, NJ

Thomas Taylor is the building and roofing science advisor for GAF. This position is focused on the technical attributes and analysis of the various elements within a commercial roof assembly. He is a frequent presenter at both national and regional industry meetings. He has over 25 years of experience in the building products industry, all working for manufacturing organizations in a variety of new product development roles. He has a PhD in chemistry and holds approximately 35 patents.

11:00 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Recertification Resurgence—Mitigating Risk in our Nation’s Older Structures

Classification

BE, R, S

Session Description

On June 24, 2021, tragedy struck the structural engineering community as the Champlain Towers South condominium partially collapsed in Surfside, Florida. From the rubble of this collapse sparked a strong resurgence in the demand for building condition assessments and repairs. Most notably, the 40-year recertification process has come to the forefront of the building diagnostics industry, and the frequency and detail of these assessments have been the subject of much debate. Understanding the interdependence between the building enclosure and the structural system is paramount to the efficacy of the recertification process. Industry-proven strategies should be employed during the assessment and repair phases. Conversely, the longevity of the building enclosure starts with design. Best practices for selecting and designing the appropriate enclosure system should be implemented to avoid premature distress. The collapse triggered changes in inspection requirements at county and state levels. Understanding these changes will help building owners plan for current and future repair and maintenance costs. These changes will no doubt necessitate more frequent assessments. Advancements in assessment technology, including drone surveys and robotic systems capable of automating visual reviews, will aid in the increased demand and will help engineers maintain an efficient process while mitigating risk in aged buildings.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the components of 40-year recertification and changes at the county and state level after the Surfside collapse.
  • Identify assessment methods for determining the condition of existing enclosures.
  • Outline best practices for the design of new buildings to prevent premature distress.
  • Discuss potential code changes and the future of building assessment technology.

Speakers

Tricia Fitzgerald, PE, LEED AP
Walter P Moore & Associates | Miami, Florida

Tricia Fitzgerald, PE, LEED AP, is an engineer and senior project manager in our Diagnostics Group with more than 20 years of experience in structural engineering, building enclosure consulting, and forensic consulting. Fitzgerald’s expertise includes evaluating, assessing, and designing repairs for structural systems and building enclosure components. She develops work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for concrete restoration, waterproofing, stucco and EIFS cladding, and window rehabilitation projects.

Tarcisio Noguera PE, LEED AP, WMI
Walter P Moore & Associates Diagnostics | Pembroke Pines, FL

Tarcisio Noguera, PE, LEED AP, WMI, THLV2, is an engineer and senior project manager in Walter P Moore Diagnostics who focuses on existing structures. He has more than 15 years of domestic and international experience in the field of building enclosures and forensic engineering. Noguera expertise includes assessing and designing repairs for distress related to moisture management, roofing systems, and below-grade waterproofing on concrete substrates. He has also developed work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for roofing, waterproofing, restoration, and rehabilitation projects. Noguera has performed multiple 40-year recertifications to buildings in Florida’s Miami Dade and Broward County.

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.
Durability, the Forgotten Pillar of Sustainability

Classification

BE, S

Session Description

This presentation will review the recent literature regarding the relationship between the resilience and sustainability of our buildings with the durability of building enclosure systems. Building enclosure durability is essential for limiting critical structural and enclosure-related failures that could have significant operational, financial, comfort, or health-related implications on the building and its occupants. Moreover, with the frequency and severity of major weather events on the rise, it is crucial that engineers stay up to date on new requirements being adopted in building codes and technical standards to address these changes. Building durability also has a critical importance on the overall sustainability of the building. Less durable systems need to be replaced or repaired more often, leading to additional embodied and operational energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Topics to be covered in this presentation include key considerations, standards, and testing requirements regarding the durability of various enclosure systems; the relationship between durability and lifecycle GHG emissions; and, recommended design and construction practices to improve the durability and resilience of the buildings enclosure systems. 

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate the effects of climate change and worsening weather events on building enclosure durability.
  • Discuss the relationship between durability and lifecycle GHG emissions.
  • Summarize key considerations, standards, and testing requirements regarding the durability of various enclsoure systems.
  • Explain recommended design practices to improve the durability and resilience of the building enclsoure systems.

Speaker

Brandon Gemme
Read Jones Christoffersen | Toronto, Ontario

Brandon Gemme is a building science engineer at RJC’s Building Science and Restoration division located in Toronto, Canada. He received his Bachelor of Applied Science in civil engineering from the University of Toronto in 2016, with a minor in sustainable energy systems and a certificate of engineering business. Gemme is responsible for evaluations, investigations, and remediation of building enclosure systems, as well as the implementation of rehabilitation and preventative maintenance programs. He has been involved in several deep energy retrofit projects and has gained valuable experience in the design, modeling, and management of these projects.

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Midcentury Modern Masonry Mishaps

Classification

EW, R

Session Description

Many of the buildings constructed following World War II up to 1970 can generally be categorized as midcentury modern. During that time, new technologies allowed masonry to be used in such a manner to achieve minimalist expressions with an emphasis on functionality, organic, and geometric forms and mixing of materials, all characteristics common to the mid-century modern style. The widespread use of thin stone cladding systems, stack bonded brick, flat terra cotta panels, concrete, and glass block was the masonry pallet used by designers during this period. As these facades have aged, issues related to durability, serviceability, and water management have developed, which were uncommon within traditional masonry facades. The evaluation, maintenance, repair, and restoration of these architectural gems is generally governed by the Secretary of the Interior Standards considering many of these buildings have surpassed 50 years of service and thus are categorized as “historic,” often qualifying for the National Register of Historic Places. This presentation will break down the typical materials and systems used in masonry construction during the midcentury modern era. An exploration of commonly occurring issues with these structures and review of repair approaches, all supplemented with short case studies, will also be provided.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe materials and cladding systems that were typically used during the period between 1940 and 1970.
  • Discuss examples of the mechanism of deterioration and distress in midcentury cladding systems.
  • Examine the repair and approaches that could be considered for various conditions that occur in the midcentury cladding systems.
  • Evaluate potential new issues that could develop in midcentury cladding systems as they continue to age.

Speakers

Edward Gerns, RA, LEED, AP
WJE | Chicago, IL

Edward Gerns is a project manager and project architect/engineer experienced in the investigation and repair of deteriorated conditions in existing buildings. He performs evaluations of brick, terra cotta, and stone masonry; assesses causes of collapse or distress in existing cladding systems; and has inspected numerous structures damaged by wind, ice, snow, and fire. Gerns has overseen the preparation of repair documents for contemporary and historic buildings and structures.

Leah Ruther
WJE | Grand Haven, MI

Leah Ruther has been involved in numerous projects related to both structural engineering and architecture. Her typical responsibilities have included the investigation and analysis of existing and damaged structures, the development of technical repair and rehabilitation documents, and construction observations. Ruther has performed a variety of structural analyses on steel, concrete, masonry, and wood structures. She has assisted with several non-destructive investigations and has completed multiple condition assessments.

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.
There’s a Lot of Hot Air in Consulting. What’s It All About?

Classification

BPD

Session Description

Geared toward students and emerging professionals, this session focuses on the fundamental control layers of the building enclosure. The presentation introduces the importance of water management, moisture and air movement (vapor), and thermal continuity. Concepts of vapor drive, thermal breaks, mechanical systems integration, and building enclosure commissioning will be introduced. A discussion on various enclosure details to establish tools for collaboration will be included. This session is highly interactive to prepare the new or emerging professionals within the industry, with baseline insights to help engage them in more advanced sessions throughout the convention. 

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the importance of moisture, air, vapor, and thermal continuity.
  • Discuss the risks associated with discontinuities.
  • Identify control layers and pinpoint discontinuity.
  • Review the importance of consulting and collaborating among architects, engineers, and consultants.

Speakers

Jennifer Keegan, AAIA
GAF | Amber, PA 

Jennifer Keegan is the director of Building and Roofing Science for GAF, focusing on overall roof system design and performance. She has over 20 years of experience as a building enclosure consultant specializing in building forensics, assessment, design, and remediation of building enclosure systems. Keegan provides technical leadership within the industry as the chair of the ASTM D08.22 Roofing and Waterproofing Subcommittee as the IIBEC Education Committee chair, and as an advocate for women within the industry as an executive board member of National Women in Roofing and a board member of Women in Construction.

Darbi Krumpos
Trinity | ERD | Seattle, WA 

Darbi Krumpos has over 25 years of experience at Trinity | ERD. She graduated from Seattle University with a bachelor of science in mathematics. She is a certified documents technologist and holds two building enclosure commissioning certificates. Project support includes code compliance and warranty support, coordination of private and public projects worldwide, litigation and remediation for condominium associations and owners, investigation, and research related to construction deficiencies and litigation, specification writing, and contract administration for new construction and remediation for both commercial and residential projects, building enclosure commissioning, field testing, and quality assurance and quality control program management.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Lightning Protection Systems: Coordinating with the Building Enclosure

Classification

BE, R, BET

Session Description

Whether it’s a modern high-rise or a historical building, there are considerations with structural design and building materials that should be understood for the successful installation of a lightning protection system. This presentation will outline the process for early collaboration among construction trades to ensure a proper design and installation. The presenters will also provide a clear understanding of how to address various systems that may be encountered during a reroofing project.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the fundamentals of a lightning protection system: how they work, adherence to the latest national standards, and proper installation procedures.
  • Outline the main considerations during the design and installation of a properly installed lightning protection system. This includes, structure design, material choices and sizes, and the role of a certified individual throughout the process.
  • Introduce possible building (oddly shaped, rooftop terraces, historical structures) challenges that may occur during the installation of the system and offer resolutions.
  • Provide suggestions to coordinate with different construction trades.
  • Summarize the importance of inspection by a third party to ensure proper installation of the lightning protection system.

Speakers

Tim Harger, Executive Director
The Lightning Protection Institute Libertyville, Illinois

Tim Harger is an industry expert with an entrepreneurial spirit. For over 35 years, he has engaged in all aspects of the lightning protection industry: manufacturing, installation, and inspection. With these diverse experiences, he developed a vision of growth for the lightning protection industry that involves high standards, education, and partnerships. Harger’s desire to maintain high standards comes from his involvement with ANSI accreditation and the ISO certification processes. Furthermore, he understands the value of partnerships to gain different perspectives and to learn best practices, which can be seen in his involvement in the NFPA 780 Committee and industry associations such as American Institute of Architects and IIBEC. Harger holds a bachelor of science in industrial technology from Iowa State University. He also is a certified LPI Master Installer Designer. He has served as the executive director of the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) for just over two years and has been the program manager for the LPI-IP, which is the industry’s third-party inspection program, for over 10 years.

Kelley Collins, Director of Business Development and Communications
The Lightning Protection Institute 
Libertyville, Illinois

Kelley Collins has been immersed in the science and technology industries for over 25 years, with diverse roles such as executive management, marketing, sales, and consulting. She was intrigued with the science and the opportunity for growth in the lightning protection industry and joined LPI just over two years ago. Currently, Collins works with LPI developing strategy, partnerships, and communication to support the expansion and awareness of the lightning protection industry. She attended the University of Georgia’s Terry School of Business with a degree in management and marketing. She holds a master’s in business management and organizational behavior from Benedictine University and two professional certificates: organizational development and management in a technical environment. She is also the co-developer and instructor for the science communication program for PhD students at Northwestern University.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Prefabricated Wall Panels: Lessons Learned

Classification

EW

Session Description

Over the last 10 years, the use of prefabricated wall panels has become a common option for exterior wall systems. These systems range from backup panels (e.g., metal studs, with pre-applied exterior sheathing and the air/water barrier) to completed wall panels complete with cladding (e.g., finished exterior insulation finishing systems) or masonry veneer exterior system) to unitized curtain wall assemblies. Prefabricated wall panels allow for increased quality control of the prefabricated components and increased construction speed, but prefabrication is not a solution for all buildings or exterior wall types.

Many prefabricated assemblies require substantial work and care in the field to address panel-to-panel joints or field conditions, thus limiting the benefits of prefabrication. This presentation will discuss what types of buildings and structures are best suited for prefabricated wall panels, particularly opaque cladding systems. A discussion on the principles of prefabrication and the typical prefabrication process, including coordination and development during the design phase, typical shop drawing and submittal process, prefabrication, and erection/assembly will be provided. The presenters will also discuss project-specific lessons learned, providing both a contractor and consultant perspective.

Learning Objectives

  • Define prefabricated wall panels.
  • Compare varying types of prefabricated wall panels.
  • Summarize the principals of prefabricated wall panels.
  • Discuss strategies to determine if prefabricated wall panels are appropriate for a given project.

Speakers

Lee Cope, PE
Southern Wall Systems | Suwanee, Georgia

Lee Cope is a licensed Professional Engineer who spent 19 years with Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc., where he developed extensive experience in detailing and proper installation of facade systems, air barriers, window systems, waterproofing, and the interfaces of various enclsoure components. In 2018, Cope joined Southern Wall Systems to run their restoration division and assist in their new construction divisions. He is a voting member of ASTM Committee C11 on Gypsum and Related Building Materials and Systems.

Nicholas Floyd, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. | Houston, TX

Nicholas Floyd is a licensed professional engineer who joined Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. (SGH) in 2003 and specializes in the design, investigation, and remediation of building enclosures. His past and current projects include enclosure investigation, design, and construction administration of several large public structures, educational facilities, and commercial properties. Floyd has experience designing and investigating contemporary cladding systems, as well as fenestration, roofing, and waterproofing.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

The Business Case for Challenging the Status Quo and Improving Employee Culture

Classification

BPD 

Session Description

Advocates of diversity equity and inclusion principles understand that diverse workplaces have the opportunity to increase productivity and innovation, reduce employee turnover, and foster the ability to connect with a larger customer base. These concepts are well supported by research, but business leaders and diversity advocates are still promoting a version that is far too simple. Just increasing the number of traditionally underrepresented people does not automatically produce benefits. Instead, business leaders need to move beyond thinking of diversity as a simple quota. Progressive and forward-thinking owners and leaders should be committed to actionable items that lead to authentic change. This presentation will touch on diversity, equity, and inclusion but will mainly focus on how and who building enclosure consultants can implement to create an inclusive culture that has benefits for all.

This presentation will be based on the most current DEI research and supplemented with practical information and examples by IIBEC members who have used DEI principles in their offices and/or companies. It will also include specific action items and tangible resources that participants can download and start using right away, including a demonstration of REAL Roofing—a DEI education course that has been custom-made for the roofing industry. 

Learning Objectives

  • Define and explain the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Evaluate the most current forward-thinking research on diversity, equity, and inclusion practices.
  • Use proper terminology and vernacular when discussing diversity, equity, and inclusion issues.
  • Identify actionable items and resources to incorporate into business practices and employee handbooks.

Speakers

Jennifer Stone
Johns Manville | Northern CA

Jennifer Stone is with Johns Manville. She previously served as president of a roofing contracting and service company located in the Pacific Northwest and has extensive experience with a horticulture company focused on plant design, living walls, and vegetative roofing. She has held volunteer leadership positions with the BOMA Sustainability Council and the Roofing Contractors Association of Washington. She is a past chair of National Women in Roofing. Stone is the primary volunteer leader working on the creation of REAL Roofing, a diversity education program for the roofing and building enclosure industries. After spending most of her life in the Seattle area. She now lives in Northern California.

Ellen Thorp
National Women in Roofing | Denver, CO

Ellen Thorp knows that powerful things happen when people who share a common interest come together for advocacy, education, and communication. In addition to providing leadership and advocacy work for other construction-related trade associations, Thorp has grown NWiR to 2000 members, 40 sponsors, and programs that have engaged thousands of people. She has a bachelor’s degree in political science, and a master’s degree in education policy, and has earned the rigorous Certified Association Executive designation. After spending 22 years in Washington, D.C., working for associations and educational institutions, she and her family now live in the Denver area.


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